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DoGMaN X
03-14-2011, 01:30 PM
I'm still young to 3D and I know many people who learn 3D software using tutorials, because its the best, affordable way to learn it around me.

There is a question that I have been curious about.

For people who are still young to this industry, how well are finished tutorial pieces received? By employers, professionals or whoever.

Completing a tutorial may end up with a certain quality piece of work, but was constructed using heavy guidance by the form of a tutorial. Would this factor hamper the quality of the completed piece or the individual that developed it - if he went for a job application, etc.

Cageman
03-14-2011, 01:43 PM
I'm still young to 3D and I know many people who learn 3D software using tutorials, because its the best, affordable way to learn it around me.

There is a question that I have been curious about.

For people who are still young to this industry, how well are finished tutorial pieces received? By employers, professionals or whoever.

Completing a tutorial may end up with a certain quality piece of work, but was constructed using heavy guidance by the form of a tutorial. Would this factor hamper the quality of the completed piece or the individual that developed it - if he went for a job application, etc.

Hmm... well... following a tutorial is quite easy, the hard part is to actually understand the tutorial and, obviously, be able to take what you learned from the tutorial and apply it in other situations or modify the technique to fit a specific task.

So, my suggestion is to leave out anything that strictly follows a tutorial.

JeffrySG
03-14-2011, 01:53 PM
Hmm... well... following a tutorial is quite easy, the hard part is to actually understand the tutorial and, obviously, be able to take what you learned from the tutorial and apply it in other situations or modify the technique to fit a specific task.

So, my suggestion is to leave out anything that strictly follows a tutorial.

:agree: Yep, can't agree more. I've seen many people who have completed tutorial projects in their galleries. After you've seen it a few times they become very easy to pick out. I would definitely leave them out of anything related to getting a job. If you put them in it will just seem like you don't have enough experience or other content to show. Take what you've learned from a tutorial and create a new piece from the skills that you've picked up.

Greenlaw
03-14-2011, 02:16 PM
You should definitely use tutorials to improve your knowledge and skills but my recommendation is to NOT put the actual tutorial results on your demo reel. Use the knowledge you get from tutorials to make your own original demo pieces; this shows you understand what you've learned and you know how to use that knowledge. If your own demo pieces go beyond the results of a tutorial, even better.

FYI, my very first demo reel was strictly made up of original, personal pieces, and it helped land me a long term job quickly. At the time, my cg work was hardly the 'best work ever' but I think it showed creativity and initiative, which is what my employer back then was looking for. If I had put tutorial pieces on that reel, I think it would have been totally ignored if not laughed at. (Okay, some of my pieces did get laughed at but luckily that was reaction I wanted from them.) :)

The important thing is to make the content relevant to the type of job your aiming for and to put in your best effort to making it look at least as good as what you currently see in the market.

Good luck!

G.

DoGMaN X
03-14-2011, 04:57 PM
Cheers guys, can't get enough of this sort of information at the moment :)

Surrealist.
03-14-2011, 07:20 PM
Well I have to agree obviously to a large extent.

However I can also offer a little bit of perspective. Really it depends on where you are trying to get a job. Most of my clients for freelance work are not also 3D pros. They would not know a tutorial if they saw one.

My point. Your progress as an artist is a gradual one. Take it in steps. If the result of a logo tutorial that you have on a reel helps you get a first job to do some graphics for a website where your client really is not a 3D professional, then it was a good thing.

You definitely need to get past tutorials. But also take it from where you are to the next step. As mentioned take the info from a tutorial and make it your own. But don't let this hold you back. Do know your audience, but also be realistic about where you are and work to move forward. If you are young at 3D then you are not likely to create anything that is going to impress a pro. But there is plenty of work for you along the way as you improve. One thing for sure. To get work, you have to show work. Work to gradually cycle out the not-so good stuff for better work to show.

And keep working on something - always to improve. And never stop doing tutorials and learning - ever. Just put one foot in front of the other and walk. Take the next gradual step to improvement and a better job. Don't think you have to be at some predetermined level to start getting work. Start working now if you can. And keep giving yourself challenges and projects to do until you can.

And good luck in your endeavors.

DoGMaN X
03-14-2011, 08:13 PM
Thanks for the guidance there, I will be finishing university in a few months and I will be targeting internships and graduate placements.

They do seem very hard to come by to be honest. I was also wondering, how effective is a video showreel when compared to say an online portfolio? I understand on this too it may depend on the person viewing it but is it generally recommended to produce a video showreel rather than a portfolio?

Greenlaw
03-14-2011, 09:07 PM
It depends on the industry you're targeting.

For animation and fx, most companies want to see a video demo. This can be submitted as a DVD but it's become common for people to provide a link to a website player instead. IMO, it's probably best to cover yourself and have both available. When we conduct interviews here, we typically go through the reel shot by shot with the artist, and a DVD is usually more convenient for us to display on a big screen. Just to be safe, it doesn't hurt to ask a company's HR department for submission requirements.

Before I got into film and tv production, I worked as a freelance illustrator for print publication, mainly for children's products and educational books. I also did a lot of toy designs for fast food premiums. Back then, it was all about having a an ad in an artists directory, a printed portfolio and a online gallery/portfolio. It's the same today, though nowadays I imagine there's more reliance on the web for showcasing an artists work.

For a short time I had a rep but I soon found I could keep busy just on my own. Having a third party rep you is a matter of personal preference I'm sure; there are some artists who only use reps to get work and others thrive without them. A good rep can keep you busy with the kind of work you want to do, but the trick is in finding one that understands your interests and has the right contacts for you. The rep I had started out good (my first Los Angeles gig was as a character designer for Klasy-Csupo) but after a year I found myself turning down a lot of jobs from this rep because I felt they were just inappropriate for me.

Hope this helps.

G.