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jrandom
02-28-2011, 09:42 PM
I was hoping this would have been fixed in LW10 (64-bit, Mac), but I see it still persists.

If I assign a UV map to a Sub-D model and set the interpolation to anything but "Linear", it doesn't display correctly in the UV Texture window (see attached). Is there a way to fix this?

probiner
02-28-2011, 10:23 PM
You are using Catmull-Clark right? Those interpolations are only supported for Subpatches. Why it would be different in LW10?

jrandom
02-28-2011, 10:28 PM
So for Catmull-Clark I want to use linear interpolation?

probiner
02-28-2011, 11:14 PM
LOL, it's not that you want, you don't have another alternative in LW for CC. Even with another interpolation selected, it renders stuff like linear.
Smooth Interpolations are mandatory for organic meshes if you are going to paint textures in 2D applications, but if thats not the case and you are going to paint in something like 3D-Coat, that handles seams well for example and with 3D projection, you can either use Ptex/make a Shells UV map( both not human friendly, but very effective), Or if you want the usual unwrap but somewhat relaxed to the subdivision (but will still be linear) this video might help you: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxiJo_nt5J0

Cheers

JeffrySG
03-01-2011, 09:57 AM
I think if you want to be using uv maps on a subd object you should strive for quads/tris so you can then use subpatch. If you have a model with a lot of n-gons you can always always freeze the model (save a copy of the original, though) at level 1 CC and then apply your subpatch subd to it as it will be all quads at that point. Although the poly count for the base model will be much higher. It's just a quick way to get rid of all your ngons if you need to do it fast and poly count isn't' too important. Your poly count won't be higher at render time as you'd be subdividing past level one most likely anyway... just one option if you have a lot of n-gons and you need to use subpatch.

Of course you could always manually change ngons to quads/tris too. :)

...and yes, I would have hoped that it would have been addressed in v10 as well. :(

nickdigital
03-01-2011, 10:20 AM
Is the issue that you end up painting on the cage versus what the sub'd uv looks like? If so you could try the SubD UV prep lscript.
http://www.clintons3d.com/plugins/lightwave/index.html

daforum
03-01-2011, 01:04 PM
Nickdigital, can you explain what this script does exactly and in what situations it would be best to use it?
I've been wanting to use it but haven't had an opportunity to.
:)

nickdigital
03-01-2011, 01:11 PM
Nickdigital, can you explain what this script does exactly and in what situations it would be best to use it?
I've been wanting to use it but haven't had an opportunity to.
:)

If you've ever had a sub'd model and exported out the UV to paint via UVImaginator it displays the polys un-sub'd. So it might be hard to get an idea of what you're painting on since you're painting on the cage.

This lscript copies your object and freezes it so you can print out your UV closer to how it looks when sub'd.

See the two images. The object is a basic 6 sided sub'd cube with an atlas map. The one image is how UVImaginator normally prints out the UV. The other is after using the lscript.

jrandom
03-01-2011, 03:46 PM
But if you're looking at the curved Sub-D mesh in the exported UV map, doesn't that causes mismatches in UV painting since Lightwave is going to have a linear UV map for that same object?

I am so confused.

(All this came about because I'm looking into baking UV maps for diffuse, specular, reflection, etc... generated from procedural nodes in prep for rendering on machines that do not have those same procedural nodes.)

daforum
03-01-2011, 03:53 PM
If you've ever had a sub'd model and exported out the UV to paint via UVImaginator it displays the polys un-sub'd. So it might be hard to get an idea of what you're painting on since you're painting on the cage.

This lscript copies your object and freezes it so you can print out your UV closer to how it looks when sub'd.

See the two images. The object is a basic 6 sided sub'd cube with an atlas map. The one image is how UVImaginator normally prints out the UV. The other is after using the lscript.

Very cool, thanks nickdigital :)

probiner
03-01-2011, 03:58 PM
But if you're looking at the curved Sub-D mesh in the exported UV map, doesn't that causes mismatches in UV painting since Lightwave is going to have a linear UV map for that same object?

I am so confused.

(All this came about because I'm looking into baking UV maps for diffuse, specular, reflection, etc... generated from procedural nodes in prep for rendering on machines that do not have those same procedural nodes.)

Ahh. You didn't mention that.

By machines you meant other sofwares as well? Are you going to freeze the mesh or there will be Subdivision going on? etc..

Cheers


EDIT: Sorry if i might confused you =P The SubdS Level you use to export must be the same you use to render.
Anyway another info to the pile: http://www.blytools.com/baker.html, which is used in modeler and can bake Procedurals. Just put the model foreground and a copy in the background, both frozen and run the plugin and choose channels and resolution you want and its done. (Myagi powa!)

Cheers

nickdigital
03-01-2011, 04:06 PM
But if you're looking at the curved Sub-D mesh in the exported UV map, doesn't that causes mismatches in UV painting since Lightwave is going to have a linear UV map for that same object?

I am so confused.

(All this came about because I'm looking into baking UV maps for diffuse, specular, reflection, etc... generated from procedural nodes in prep for rendering on machines that do not have those same procedural nodes.)

No because you're still going to set the UV interpolation to sub'd and your model is still sub'd.

If you painted your UV based on the sub'd export and turned the sub'ds off on your object then yes, parts of your model will be missing texture and the polygons will be taking up different space in the UV.

jrandom
03-01-2011, 04:13 PM
Ahh. You didn't mention that.

By machines you meant other sofwares as well? Are you going to freeze the mesh or there will be Subdivision going on? etc..

Possibly. Maybe. :)

Most of this is just prep work -- I'm betting there will be times in the future where I'm going to need to rent some time on a render farm, and render farms aren't always going to have the same node plugins I have on my local machine.

The DPont fiasco (where he pulled all his plugins for awhile) scared me because what if I had to hand those plugins over to a render farm? Would that be a breach of license? And I couldn't hand over the IFW2 nodes because a render farm has to license those at a non-trivial-price-for-individuals to use them.

This scared me away from third-party nodes for awhile, but then I realized I could always render the final node-generated elements to large-scale texture maps and then use those in the final objects. It's not as elegant as using the procedural nodes directly (and limits the fine-detail and how close the camera can come to an object), but it's still a workable solution in most cases.

For practice (and workflow design), I started with a simple planet made from a low-poly Sub-D mesh. Assigning the UV coordinates was when I noticed this particular UV viewport weirdness.

probiner
03-01-2011, 04:41 PM
I see.
If you just want the procedurals then Surface Baking Camera should do the work. I just pointed out Myagi's Baker (http://www.blytools.com/baker.html) because you don't even have to leave Modeler and it's much faster to setup and with more options than the Camera.

jrandom
03-01-2011, 04:55 PM
I see.
If you just want the procedurals then Surface Baking Camera should do the work. I just pointed out Myagi's Baker (http://www.blytools.com/baker.html) because you don't even have to leave Modeler and it's much faster to setup and with more options than the Camera.

That plugin is PERFECT! Thank you!