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Ryan Roye
02-25-2011, 08:13 PM
IKbooster has been a critical tool for many of my animations, I like the most that I can simply grab bones and move them dynamically in the 3d screen. Its not perfect and the interface is lackluster, but I can't imagine animating without it.

So i've been curious. I know that in the long run (I'd say about 2-3 years from now) I will need to find some alternate means of animating my characters. I'm typically at the lowest end of the technology curve, by the way... relying on old technology to accomplish my 3d hobby projects a lot of the time. I am currently using LW 9.6.

The question: what is out there in Lightwave that can match IKbooster's speed? Is it just alternate rigging setups? Does the average person still use IKbooster? Or is there some new tool out there that Lightwave users use?

MaDDoX
02-25-2011, 09:28 PM
The question: what is out there in Lightwave that can match IKbooster's speed?

To be blunt: nothing. As people get more and more technical about rigging, they forget that IKBoost is the only on-the-fly, non-pre-rigged IK-posing tool in the marketing. At least as far as I'm aware of.

Most people don't realize its power, for instance, that if you bind the IKBoost shortcut to something really handy (I use "Q" for IKB, "E" for rotate, with LightKeys) you can practically instantly switch from the regular rotation tool - which is best for FK rotations due to the gizmo better visual feedback - to the IKBoost-mode handles for IK posing. Any constraint that you setup in IKB-mode (like interactive angle limits, for instance) also apply to the regular rotation tool, and vice-versa. You can lock rotation axis with the rotation tool and they'll reflect in IKB mode, allowing for much more predictable IK-posing of joints. Quaternion Booster, applied to those joints/bones, help tons with the interpolation of the IKB-created poses, meaning smoother and predictable interpolation. I don't know anything more flexible and quicker to setup than IKB for posing fingers or tentacles, and I won't even mention all you can do with its powerful physics options.

There are so many goodies about IKB that I can only grind teeth whenever I read someone mention that CORE won't have any replacement for IKBooster.. What a shame -_-

toeknee
02-25-2011, 10:23 PM
Hey Chazriker, I also use IKBoost on a Dayle basis and would find it hard to go back to the old way of doing things. As far as IKBoost goes I only have one major complaint and that is the mysterious unwanted rotations. I know that this rotation problem is a Lightwave problem not a IKBoost spacific problem.
As for other solutions. I have Rebel Hills RHiggit Lite and I think that is a fine tool. I also own Maestro and that too is a fine tool. But just like you they don't replace the beautiful simplicity and cleanness of working with IKBoost.
I do how ever think that a combination of the two are very powerful.
I say this because RHiggit Lite is IMHO the best auto rigging tool available for Lightwave and Maestro has the rest. It has a dope track and a way of working with Hot spots that is I feel as fast or faster than IKBoost.
The only problem I have with Maestro is that it is not very quick to fit their rig with your character. I think that this is its only big weakness. However if you use RHiggit Lite you are able to quickly have an extremely functional rig in minuets. The only issue with this idea is that you would need to set up the rig in Maestro and make it a preset.
This is not a major problem but it would take some time to setup the first one.
So, for the foreseeable future that is the solution I would look at.
http://stillwaterpictures.com/maestro/
Maestro 2 full version - $149.95 for what you get its totally a deal really great and
http://www.rebelhill.net/html/rhiggit.html
This one is 40 still a great deal and the combination of the two are extremely powerful.

I will add a small side note that might be helpful. My current workflow consists of two directions. One is to use Jimmy Rigger for fast rigs and mocap and then use IKBoost to modify the animation, as well as add new key poses to the animations.
I have found that the auto rigger in Jimmy rigger could be better but it is great for fast animated characters.
The second thing that I have been doing and I am very excited about because it follows in the tradition of IKBoost in being light fast and easy, Is too do my animation in IKBoost and then bring the animated character in to Blender and us Blenders shape keys (I.E. endomorphs) with Blenders Sculpting tools. I have found that this is the easiest way to art direct your deformation part of your animation. I hope that this has been helpful and good luck.

toeknee
02-25-2011, 10:43 PM
Hey Maddox if you have any good solution for the rotation problem in Lightwave of if Rebelhill has one so I can still focus on IKBoost it would be much appreciated. I have tried Quaternion booster and it really didn't help fully. And when I mean a rotation problem I am saying that I may move a foot or twist a leg a little and when I play back through the animation the leg or the foot is doing complete 360 of more rotations that I did not define at all.
I have read other post that have stated that this was somewhat do to the Euler rotation system that is the underlying system for Lightwave. So, if anyone can help me with this I would be a very happy guy.

Ryan Roye
02-25-2011, 11:25 PM
Thanks for the detailed replies! IKbooster does fit all of my needs at this time considering its easy to set up even non-biped characters, which my work will have in quantity (which rules out Rhiggit). None of my stuff is ultra detailed, so while maestro looks great it seems like overkill for my projects. Maybe that'll change later eh? :)

It is good to know what else is out there though and also nice that IKbooster is still considered a powerful tool in the eyes of others. I feel I have a fair grasp on IKbooster but i've yet to delve into more advanced features such as dynamics and storing/recalling poses.

evenflcw
02-26-2011, 03:36 AM
You who use IKBooster (with Quaterion Booster or not) do you still use the graph editor or is that something you try to avoid?

Ryan Roye
02-26-2011, 06:48 AM
You who use IKBooster (with Quaterion Booster or not) do you still use the graph editor or is that something you try to avoid?

For character animation, I really dislike using the graph editor so yeah, I avoid it *most* of the time. Usually I just do the following:

-Moving the camera I use the graph editor a lot to smooth curves and determine curve biases... switching to stepped curves when doing cuts. I almost never use more than 1 camera. I suppose this could also be true for objects without bones.

-Resetting a character's bones via stepped curves. This allows me to make certain that none of the movements I do after the "step" will be affected in any way. I typically do this after camera cuts, or before a character reappears in a scene.

-Simulating the "ease out" in tension by making 3 keyframes, with the middle keyframe dictating which side gets the bias. Its not as clean as using the graph editor but it works without me switching back and fourth.

jasonwestmas
02-26-2011, 07:56 AM
The only setup that is faster than IKBooster is Rhiggit. You can also attach IKB to the Rhiggit Manipulators or add/subtract bones to the setup as you see fit. Rhiggit is so easy to setup and animate with after a few walk throughs. I still find the IKB manipulator/ handle system one of the best things LW has to offer for animation. Its Part-Time IK for fingers, spines, arms and tentacles is really a nice treat to use. I still believe though you have to use traditional full-time IK to get hands and feet to stick to a surface in a productive manner.

toeknee
02-26-2011, 10:14 AM
Hi Evenflcw, the simple answer is yes of course you should use the graph editor. Any descent animation is all about timing, weight, arcs and so on all these things need exact control over channel curves. This is a critical aspect of animation. That is even more reason to use IKBoost because. If you right click on any channel of any handle for IKBoost you see the option for open graph editor.
Not only does it open the graph editor but it opens that exact channel, so there is no need to search through the list of objects. Many times I will use IKBoost for this functionality alone.

MaDDoX
02-27-2011, 12:24 AM
The only setup that is faster than IKBooster is Rhiggit.
I especifically mentioned "not pre-rigged" ;) The huge advantage of IKB is in making your rigging on-the-fly, as you need it and especially *when* you need it - exactly, right in the middle of an animation - in a completely non-destructive and non-linear way. Traditional rigging forces you to plan everything your character has to do in advance, and God forbid any additional need arise after you've spent major time into a certain animation. It's a bit like explicit weighting vs procedural (native/implicit) weighting, sure explicit weighting has its advantages but it'll never have the amazing flexibility of procedural weights. In the end of the day your best approach is using a good mix of both. For instance, I will use IK for the legs and regular FK + IKB for the arms, yet that doesn't mean I won't have IK set up for the arms - if I need hands or arms pinned for any scene, I simply blend to true IK, simple. Now, is biped/quadruped animation all there is? Definitely not, for instance, I've got a six-tentacles creatures (in place of legs) with a human torso, arms and all to animate, would an auto-rigger do all the creature setup for me? I'm sure it won't.

My point is not downplaying traditional rigging, what I mean is that IKB is brilliant, revolutionary even, and I expect to see more of its non-linear philosophy in the future, not any less!


when I mean a rotation problem I am saying that I may move a foot or twist a leg a little and when I play back through the animation the leg or the foot is doing complete 360 of more rotations that I did not define at all.
I have read other post that have stated that this was somewhat do to the Euler rotation system that is the underlying system for Lightwave. So, if anyone can help me with this I would be a very happy guy.
Sure. There are indeed a few tricks with keeping your euler rotations happy, IKB won't change the way LW deal with euler rotations. For starters bear in mind that IKB solves IK just like the regular Lightwave solver, so basically you're trying to help it as much as possible - too much flexibility is definitely not good when working with euler-based IK. I'm working on a couple tutorials focused on setting up joints (rotation order, bone twists, etc) especifically for IKB, meanwhile the tip is: play with your limits and FK control settings in IKB, you might be surprised with how stable you can get those arms and legs.

The one last thing I'd like to add, and I'm sure Craig will call me crazy for saying it: I hate offsets, I refuse to animate those little hidden things, and I can get away from Gimbal Lock just fine with additional bone splitting (with slightly varying angles) on critical areas. Some might say that it's just a sort of "soft offset", but it makes a world of difference when you're actually animating, not to mention it helps a lot to prevent deformation pinching.

jeric_synergy
02-27-2011, 12:47 AM
To be blunt: nothing. As people get more and more technical about rigging, they forget that IKBoost is the only on-the-fly, non-pre-rigged IK-posing tool in the marketing. At least as far as I'm aware of.
I know of no details, but there's something in Blender that, when I heard of it, sounded vaguely IKB-ish.

You'll have to ask an actual Blender operator to find out though.

evenflcw
02-27-2011, 08:07 AM
Interesting read. Thanks!

toeknee
02-27-2011, 08:14 AM
Thanks Maddox, I appreciate the encouragement. A tutorial would be great but if you could post a scene with a rigged character that would also be very helpful. I know IKBoost well enough that I could backward engineer the rig quickly.
I say this because it would be faster and easier for you. That way we can play with this now and when you have the time to post the training we could look at it in depth. Thank you again.
I was also interested have you tried the technique I suggested with Blender and there shape keys and sculpting.
because this is about the coolest thing I have seen in a long time. just Like IKBoost its drop dead simple and it gives you the ability to totally focus on the performance.

OnlineRender
02-27-2011, 09:50 AM
I know of no details, but there's something in Blender that, when I heard of it, sounded vaguely IKB-ish.

You'll have to ask an actual Blender operator to find out though.



http://www.blendercookie.com/2011/02/07/creating_fk_ik_rig/

may help some great tuts there .

RebelHill
02-27-2011, 03:25 PM
The one last thing I'd like to add, and I'm sure Craig will call me crazy for saying it: I hate offsets, I refuse to animate those little hidden things, and I can get away from Gimbal Lock just fine with additional bone splitting (with slightly varying angles) on critical areas. Some might say that it's just a sort of "soft offset", but it makes a world of difference when you're actually animating, not to mention it helps a lot to prevent deformation pinching.

You're CRAZY!!!

But seriously...

I don't particularly like offsets either, I think that they're an annoyance, mainly in cases where there's motion happening on bothe the main part, and its offset at the same time... tweaking graphs for those moments can be a real pain.

however, i do find that their use only needs to be sparing most of the time, depending on whats going on with a given character i can often get away with not using them at all, or jsut using them for a single move here and there to pass out of gimbal, and then back in.

The bone splitting does sound to me like something of a offset type thing, its still a second item to have to work with, graph etc, so I dont see that much difference.

But despite not liking offsets either, I do tend to take them as a necessary evil, and possibly the simplest way for getting around gimbal lock issues. They do also provide one other interesting function I find... By rotating an offset to 90 deg on bank, and then counter banking (-90) the main controller, you effectively are able to change the rotation order of your item... so if theings are ordinarily setup with H ebing up/down, and pitch being back/fwd, you can swap the behaviour within the animation to go the other way... something that can come in very handy, and which you otherwise cant do in LW.

There is another alternative to using offsets (on 3d joints, so shoulders, wrists, hips and ankles) and thats to use the quaternion booster motion modifier, and simply animate the item in question using the local axis manipulator.

It does work perfectly well, and you don't get those spin out rotations ocurring when moving on a "non handle" axis... but something, and I dont really know what or why, doesnt sit totally comfortably with me about using that method... though it does work without issue so it could well just be me.

MaDDoX
02-27-2011, 10:52 PM
if you could post a scene with a rigged character that would also be very helpful. I know IKBoost well enough that I could backward engineer the rig quickly.
Sure, curiously enough I've worked on a mini-IKBoost rig today for the "Messiah Crash Course" tutorial videos, which focus heavily on sending FBX files produced in Messiah straight to Maya and Lightwave - btw, I found Messiah's auto-weight "freezing" or conversion to explicit weights to be a thing of beauty, and the best part is that you can use it comfortably with Lightwave (even more flexibly than with Maya since you can use the procedural deformation + the Messiah-generated weights) and apply IKBooster on top of it. Pure joy! I intend to post these test files in my blog for anyone to play with it.


I was also interested have you tried the technique I suggested with Blender and there shape keys and sculpting.
I'm strongly against any kind of corrective morph / blendshape except for cartoon-like characters, for the simple fact that they work linearly (like any morph doh) while its related part is rotating. It hurts me to even think about it - or the number of corrective morph poses you have to create to make such a thing work well in a more realistic character. I find it so much easier to quickly set up some muscle-like joints constrained to other joints or fixed points in the mesh.

If you want to only focus on the performance and scupt away, consider Messiah's Point Animation. It makes everything else which's morph-related aimed for pose correction look complete rubish.


You're CRAZY!!!
I knew it!


I don't particularly like offsets either, I think that they're an annoyance
I knew it!
Erm... I mean.. do you? :)


The bone splitting does sound to me like something of a offset type thing, its still a second item to have to work with, graph etc, so I dont see that much difference.
"Seeing" is actually the whole point here, not only seeing something that's not completely overlapped by another but that can also be selected visually, with-the-mouse! What a great and innovative concept not having to use arrow keys to select a controller ^_^


By rotating an offset to 90 deg on bank, and then counter banking (-90) the main controller, you effectively are able to change the rotation order of your item...
I've read about this strategy, it just makes me wonder that to use it properly you'd have to use a stepped key for the exact frame where it's changing the rotation order, or else you'd be stuck to the frame rate you're animating. Since I prefer animating with 24 FPS (easier mental timings, I've learned it like that) but later I convert it to 30 or 60 FPS, I'd be forced to set stepped keys. Yet another key interpolation conversion to keep in mind, moving me closer to the technical side and away from the artistic side, ma brains dun like me when I do zat. And yeah, I'm one of those guys that think Keith Lango's strategy of starting animation with stepped keys is complete nonsense and a huge waste of time. There, I said it. Well, I'm MaD, everybody noticed it already, so I can say any insanity I want :P


use the quaternion booster motion modifier, and simply animate the item in question using the local axis manipulator. It does work perfectly well, and you don't get those spin out rotations ocurring when moving on a "non handle" axis... but something, and I dont really know what or why, doesnt sit totally comfortably with me about using that method...
Maybe the continued use of offsets corrupted your soul? :devil: Heh. I don't know, I've got some interpolation problems previously (like the ones mentioned here) whenever two gimbal axis got too close, they don't even need to overlap, I call it "gimbal squishing". Quaternion Booster has saved me consistently in these cases, to the point that I'm not even using "soft offsets" on legs any more, I just keep them in shoulders and forearms for the additional pinch-prevention deformation help (that regular offsets can never provide) like I've mentioned before.

toeknee
02-28-2011, 01:32 AM
Thanks for the info, and yes cartoon characters are exactly what I was talking about. I really love the freedom of expression that the 2D animators have because they can distort a character in anyway they please. If done well it can really add to the performance. I think there is a great example of this in Princess and the frog with the Alligator dancing in the swamp.

I should also have mentioned that I really did not mean this technique as merely for corrective purposes at all.

I was originally inspired in this direction because of Bernhard Haux and his deformation grid rig. I found the idea of being able to as he put it art direct your scene to be very interesting. Here is his sight.
http://www.characteranimator.com/index.html

Then when I say the antisculpt plug in between blender and Maya I was hooked. I still think that this is the coolest thing I have seen in a long time. Here is a link to Antisculpt.

http://vimeo.com/2376664

Daniel Martinez Lara is the creator and he is from Spain.

http://www.pepeland.com/

Check it out, this is so far beyond the idea of corrective morphs.
Like I said earlier it take the idea of deformations and makes it as powerful and
easy as IKBoost is for rigging and animating.

pooby
02-28-2011, 03:02 AM
And yeah, I'm one of those guys that think Keith Lango's strategy of starting animation with stepped keys is complete nonsense and a huge waste of time.

Do you have any examples of your animation so we can make a judgement of how well your dismissal of this industry standard practice is working for you?

OnlineRender
02-28-2011, 04:08 AM
Do you have any examples of your animation so we can make a judgement of how well your dismissal of this industry standard practice is working for you?

:2guns: pooby play nice ,down boy .

RebelHill
02-28-2011, 05:28 AM
that can also be selected visually, with-the-mouse! What a great and innovative concept not having to use arrow keys to select a controller

What arrow keys like "pickwalking"?? Thats a pretty popular way to quickly run your selection up and down a hierarchy, often quicker than point and click... However, you could always use the schematic for picking, where nothing is overlapped by something else.



I've read about this strategy, it just makes me wonder that to use it properly you'd have to use a stepped key for the exact frame where it's changing the rotation order, or else you'd be stuck to the frame rate you're animating. Since I prefer animating with 24 FPS (easier mental timings, I've learned it like that) but later I convert it to 30 or 60 FPS, I'd be forced to set stepped keys.

Well when animating I often tend to have the graph open at the same time anyway, with track layout seleection on, so its hardly much of an effort to quickly set key to stepped, its right there for me.

Also, I remembered there's other good sues for offsets too, as they can provide a kind of "additive layer" if desired too. Say your character is reachng for something whilst trembling with fear... that can be a bit of a pain to graph to get a nice smooth rach motion, but also add the noise of the tremor on the same channels... however with the offset you can apply the additive motion there and you get a much easier to handle setup. Also ofc you can put offsets other places to allow for clever things to be done... take this root control vid of mine, where I have an offset on the root too... yes it can fix gimbal, but do plenty other stuff too, like an animatable pivot...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=509huTkNcVY

And ofc I place offsets on my IK goals, again, gimbal fixing, but also handy when you need to dunamically parent or space switch the IK, to stick to some aprt of the character, or to another character... You could pick out the item that's been constrained to, and pose it to get your IK goal stuck where you want it, or you can leave that item hidden, stick the IK goal more approximately, and tehn use the offset to fine pose the limb, or aniimate within the constrained space.

Lots of options really... so if nothing else, I think its probs better to have the offsets and not need them, than to need them and not have them.

pooby
02-28-2011, 07:05 AM
:2guns: pooby play nice ,down boy .

I might have sounded provocative, but if I started poo-pooing some technique as being a nonsense and a waste of time, it would mean absolutely nothing unless I could prove that my alternative techniques provided equally good results. After all, my results might actually be worse than the persons who's technique I am belittling.
Without anything to back it up, its just pompous guff and waffle that assumes a certain level of unearned respect from others for your opinion.

Lightwolf
02-28-2011, 07:15 AM
I might have sounded provocative, but if I started poo-pooing some technique as being a nonsense and a waste of time, it would mean absolutely nothing unless I could prove that my alternative techniques provided equally good results.
Given the exact same operator/artist of course... otherwise you're just comparing yet another set of apples and oranges ;)

After all, you'd just want to isolate the technique as being the only varying factor...

Cheers,
Mike

RebelHill
02-28-2011, 07:20 AM
I might have sounded provocative, but if I started poo-pooing some technique as being a nonsense and a waste of time, it would mean absolutely nothing unless I could prove that my alternative techniques provided equally good results. After all, my results might actually be worse than the persons who's technique I am belittling.
Without anything to back it up, its just pompous guff and waffle that assumes a certain level of unearned respect from others for your opinion.

True enough... but thbh on this particular subject Im not sure there really is a better technique... there's almost as many approaches to animation as their are animators. Ive spoken with some who prefer straight ahead, as they find pose to pose tricks them into making stiffer more robotic movements, and conversely others who shy away from straight ahead as they find their stuff comes out too floaty if they don't have the lock down pose points to aim at.

Lango's ideas also come into play with his demos of keeping keys for item in line in time, rather than having offset key times for follow through, etc, which can produce messy graphs to retime afterwards, but similarly Ive found that doing this all the time can sometimes make it difficult to get the right sense of overlap.

For my own part Ive often found that I rpefer to flit back and forth between techniques for different things... I quite like straight ahead for walks n such, but prefer pose to pose for performance, or facial stuff.

jasonwestmas
02-28-2011, 07:34 AM
I tend to work pose to pose but the interpolation of one pose to another is more stiff and robotic if there are too many bones/ manipulators on the same key frame; too many bones with the same motion curve. The idea of offsetting intuitively is pretty important. Always being true to one's vision of the feeling you want to convey and eliminating the obstructions to a nice motion curve is what gives me more success.

toeknee
02-28-2011, 02:13 PM
Hey Paul, I think that every body here truly respects you. If they don't then they don't really know who you are or your history in 3D. That being said I would ask you to please take the time and carefully read all of the post before you start with some big accusations.
What I mean is that there is nothing here that says to animators that IKBoost is better than the standard way of doing animation. The only point and this was made in the first post is that we like to use IKBoost. I have never said that IKBoost is the best tool for character animation. And if I had I was ignorant at the time.
I am also posting an animation I did with IKBoost and only IKBoost. I know that it is not a great animation but it did make the client happy and that does have its place.
I also find it interesting that I did this job in under five hours from start to finished render, because of my time constraints I received from my client. I mean every thing for example I modeled the wings that I used with the standard Ninja character in Lightwave ( I think that William Vaughn modeled. I could be wrong.) than I rigged and animated the character. I created the fire in a compositing program and that was it. about four hours and 45 minutes.
http://vimeo.com/20477014

On another side note I like IKBoost as much for its animation system as its adaptive rigging system. I think that both are a great way to work and I wish that Newtek would revamp them and make them better and better. I know that Jay Roth hated IKBoost as much or maybe even more than you do. The difference is that you know what your taking about because you actually . I am very sure he didn't. I think that your strong opinions come from really trying it and it not working out for you. That is the vibe I get from the forums anyway.

I will add this one small note and this is all. Just like Craig said different tools are better for different peoples way of working or thinking. That being said this is in no way a thread that IBKoost is a better tool than standard IK in any package.
In fact my answer to Chazriker was that in my opinion
a combination of

I have Rebel Hills RHiggit Lite and I think that is a fine tool. I also own Maestro and that too is a fine tool. But just like you they don't replace the beautiful simplicity and cleanness of working with IKBoost.
I do how ever think that a combination of the two are very powerful.
I say this because RHiggit Lite is IMHO the best auto rigging tool available for Lightwave and Maestro has the rest. It has a dope track and a way of working with Hot spots that is I feel as fast or faster than IKBoost.
The only problem I have with Maestro is that it is not very quick to fit their rig with your character. I think that this is its only big weakness. However if you use RHiggit Lite you are able to quickly have an extremely functional rig in minuets. The only issue with this idea is that you would need to set up the rig in Maestro and make it a preset.
This is not a major problem but it would take some time to setup the first one.
So, for the foreseeable future that is the solution I would look at.
http://stillwaterpictures.com/maestro/
Maestro 2 full version - $149.95 for what you get its totally a deal really great and
http://www.rebelhill.net/html/rhiggit.html
This one is 40 still a great deal and the combination of the two are extremely powerful.

pooby
02-28-2011, 03:49 PM
Given the exact same operator/artist of course... otherwise you're just comparing yet another set of apples and oranges ;)

After all, you'd just want to isolate the technique as being the only varying factor...

Cheers,
Mike
I would agree with the above if the person were clearly being subjective. IE saying that they found that it didn't work well for them, rather than labelling the technique a waste of time. By calling it a nonsense and a waste of time, they are dishing out judgement on it in an objective fashion. That is what provokes me.
Its like the old threads where Some users were hailing IKboost as being the answer to animators dreams. Yet providing nothing but the most clunky
amateurish examples that were actually simply strengthening the counter argument.
Thanks Toeknee for your kind remarks. My intention was not to have a go at IK-boost. My opinion on it has been laid down on many threads in the past.

Lightwolf
02-28-2011, 04:18 PM
I would agree with the above if the person were clearly being subjective.
I suppose I just don't believe in objectivity in any post then. :D

Cheers,
Mike

MaDDoX
03-04-2011, 05:13 PM
Do you have any examples of your animation so we can make a judgement of how well your dismissal of this industry standard practice is working for you?
Haha doesn't pooby love me? :D Sure I do. As soon as my new website is up I'll be uploading some to youtube. Never fear though, it's surely not up to your standards, yet I do plenty of hand-keyed animation and lots of keyframe "stylizing", not just fine-tuned mocap.


Without anything to back it up, its just pompous guff and waffle that assumes a certain level of unearned respect from others for your opinion.
So you don't consider arguments sufficient, which is kinda weird for a forum. My argument that it "sucks" (and I just mentioned that 'en passant' because it wasn't the point of the discussion) is because it kills my perception flow for the animation, I build poses *for* the animation at hand, I can't think about them dettached as Keith and others preach. Anyways, what are your arguments to defend stepped keys? I've heard/read some and have never being convinced by any of them, especially after forcing myself to use stepped keys in an animation.


you could always use the schematic for picking, where nothing is overlapped by something else.
Yup, I definitely like that.


its hardly much of an effort to quickly set key to stepped, its right there for me.
It's not about the effort, it just takes me off "the zone" when I'm animating. That's why I don't like it/ don't need it/ don't use it, being the rebel of "industry standards" that I am.


yes it can fix gimbal, but do plenty other stuff too, like an animatable pivot...
Auxiliary pivots are great, I was referring specifically to those joints added just to help fixing gimbal lock issues.


Lots of options really... so if nothing else, I think its probs better to have the offsets and not need them, than to need them and not have them.
Sorry man, I think it's just clutter (even when necessary). I seriously look forward when they'll definitely be a thing of the past.

ericsmith
03-05-2011, 03:26 PM
What's interesting to me is that if someone used the phrase "complete nonsense and a huge waste of time" referring to IKBoost, then a handful of people would spend the next 5 pages slamming that person into oblivion for the offense.

Seems like there's a bit of a double standard here.

Eric