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Portnoy
12-23-2010, 10:59 AM
This has been a very interesting post with a lot of great responses. I'm kinda a Johnny come lately to this animation party and have been working in print graphics for years, so I was a little concerned about going into an industry that's so dominated by young, albeit talented, newcomers coming out and the age difference. I know it realistically boils down to your reel and what your talents are but like any profession you wonder if age will be a factor in hiring for a position.

That being said, I looked into the Dave School and seriously thought about it. But wasn't sure of the relocating. I even had a chance to tour the campus when my nephew expressed interest in animation and we went to Florida for a visit. I loved the campus and the production environment and thought it would be a good choice for my nephew. He ended up changing his major to music production but Full Sail was one of the schools he looked into for that. I have to say I wasn't much impressed with Full Sail.

Like some have posted because of my situation, I have been seriously considering online schooling, although like it's been said, you miss that personal connection that's made by attending a school. I have been seriously looking into Animation Mentor or iAnimate, they look like great schools with great connections that can be made. iAnimate's a little more affordable and better payment options. If anyone can elaborate more on these schools that'd be great. Sorry for the long post.

This quote was in response to another thread on The Dave School and was suggested I post a new thread to see about any responses on AM or iAnimate. Look forward to hearing from others on this.

Don

Titus
12-23-2010, 11:17 AM
As an AM student I can give you my insight. This school has two main goals: to give you the training as a character animator and land you a job as soon as possible.

Most people there has already a day job, so think of it as a night school or something similar. The assignments are though but very specific as well, so no strong drawing skills or anything is really required. At the end you must have a strong demo reel good enough to get a job, or they won't let you graduate.

So, as with any other night school you don't really have time to make a lot of friends, obviously you have certain contact with your peers using the chat, the critique page and forum, they promote strong interaction and critiques among students, but also need an amazing energy to have your day job, work on the assignments and keep a normal life.

PS. The last term is used to polish your demo reel (and filter the good from the bad), all the questions from my peers involved techniques to find a job, to make a good interview, etc. They also have staff who is sending reels and CV to studios.

Portnoy
12-23-2010, 11:39 AM
Quote from Titus:
As an AM student I can give you my insight. This school has two main goals: to give you the training as a character animator and land you a job as soon as possible.

Most people there has already a day job, so think of it as a night school or something similar. The assignments are though but very specific as well, so no strong drawing skills or anything is really required. At the end you must have a strong demo reel good enough to get a job, or they won't let you graduate.

So, as with any other night school you don't really have time to make a lot of friends, obviously you have certain contact with your peers using the chat, the critique page and forum, they promote strong interaction and critiques among students, but also need an amazing energy to have your day job, work on the assignments and keep a normal life.

PS. The last term is used to polish your demo reel (and filter the good from the bad), all the questions from my peers involved techniques to find a job, to make a good interview, etc. They also have staff who is sending reels and CV to studios.


Titus, I'd be interested to hear how the job hunting went afterwards, where you are working now, didn't know if your demo isn't good they don't let you graduate. How were the connections you made.

I think ianimate is basically set up the same way, and Jason Ryan was a mentor with Animation Mentor, the only thing that bothers me is that all their instructors are from Dreamworks, whereas AM, the instructors work at a bunch of different places. I know that will change once iAnimate grows older. What I do like about them is their cost and payment options.

Don

Titus
12-23-2010, 11:58 AM
Titus, I'd be interested to hear how the job hunting went afterwards, where you are working now, didn't know if your demo isn't good they don't let you graduate. How were the connections you made.

Oh well, in my case AM wasn't to find a job, actually I run a small animation studio here. My goal was to get formal and strong animation education, something I don't have the chance to get in Mexico. Right now I'm mentoring some artists who work on my studio. In my case AM was an excellent experience, considering my last jobs as a technical director, AM gave me the confidence to shift and call myself an animator.



I think ianimate is basically set up the same way, and Jason Ryan was a mentor with Animation Mentor, the only thing that bothers me is that all their instructors are from Dreamworks, whereas AM, the instructors work at a bunch of different places. I know that will change once iAnimate grows older. What I do like about them is their cost and payment options.


Jason Ryan still has some recorded classes at AM, his particular animation workflow enriches the learning process.

A couple of mentors from ianimate are also mentors at AM, I'm not sure this is good since they need to devote enough time and energy to both schools. But I sincerely admire their work as animators. You have the chance to watch how they animate scenes from Shrek, Ratatouille, etc.