PDA

View Full Version : tips on how to get better at modeling?



stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 04:26 AM
Hey all,

I just wanted to ask the community as a whole for any tips or pointers on how I can improve my modeling skills. How did yall start out and what did you did to get better? Anything specific? I'm not looking for a magical fix (Although if you've got one let me know ;) ) but some hints or tips on how to improve and how yall started.
Thanks!

Danner
10-08-2010, 04:44 AM
There are many concepts to grasp for efficient modeling, thankfully there are a ton of tutorials to watch, and follow along, by some very talented folks.

Kuzey
10-08-2010, 04:51 AM
Avoid all 3 point polygons and n-gons, try and learn how to clean the mesh after Boolean operations. Avoid booleans altogether if you can..or keep them simple, so cleaning them up is easier to do.


Kuzey

Iain
10-08-2010, 05:13 AM
and what did you did to get better?!

Starting the speed modelling challenges and trying to take part in as many as possible! :hey:

stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 05:18 AM
Hey guys thanks for the tips! I started doing the speed challenges for that reason!

Kuzey: I was actually asking generally.. But the more personal and specific the better! Thanks! :D I tend to just model and not clean up my n-gons and tris! And I've learned in my most recent model that it'll get you later on! Haha!

Kuzey
10-08-2010, 05:44 AM
I tend to just model and not clean up my n-gons and tris! And I've learned in my most recent model that it'll get you later on! Haha!

That's part of the learning process as well....so you're doing fine :D

Also...recreating the model a second time can help as well. Take a short break from that particular object (to let things sink in from the first attempt) and try again later...you should end up with a better model.


Kuzey

biliousfrog
10-08-2010, 06:07 AM
Just work at it. My sub-division modelling has improved a lot over the past couple of years purely because I do more of it. Sometimes I'll start a model several times before I 'get it', then it's plain sailing...it's just about getting the right flow. The best thing to do is build your 'chops' (musical term), learn about box modelling, sub-d modelling, spline/nurbs modelling, extending from a single shape (such as head modelling from the eye socket outwards)...they're all slightly different approaches which you can use and experience will help you to decide which is best for each model (or part of).

robertoortiz
10-08-2010, 06:16 AM
I strongly suggest to take some art classes at your local art league.
Sculpture and model drawing are classes that will help you a lot in developing your spacial modeling skills.

cresshead
10-08-2010, 09:58 AM
model everything...:D

and look closely at the construction, realism is all in the DETAIL...for products, arch design etc adding bevels to catch hi-lights and mould lines are a must for convincing close up shots.

try making models just by "looking at them" not by getting background images..or just do an image search on google and model something.

as for art classes...naah don't bother waste of time they teach you 2d not 3d...:hey:

for modelling characters..try a sculpting app, it's lots of fun:)
sculpting apps>>
blender [free]
zbrush
3dcoat
mudbox

my characters improved massively once i sculpted them rather than poly by poly...re-topologise once you have a good form.

rednova
10-08-2010, 11:42 AM
Estimado Amigo:

Soy de Asuncion, Paraguay, pero vivo en EEUU por 21 anhos.
Mi familia en Paraguay son los llamosas y los Petengill.
Mucho gusto !!!
un consejo..consiga el workshop en DVD de Todd Grimes, se
encuentra en www.desktopimages.com
Es un workshop muy bueno, y ensenha el character modeling.
Es suficiente para aprender el modelado de personajes.
Buena suerte!!!

Rednova
-fernando bartra pettengill-

Qexit
10-08-2010, 02:27 PM
As has been said, there are lots of tutorials out there to work through but the bottom line in all the methods and options is:

Practice, practice, practice and then..maybe... get some more practice :D

stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 02:56 PM
Hey all!

Thanks so much for all the response and help! Every day that passes I'm more and more surprised by how great and responsive this community is!!

I know that in the end it's going to come down to practice but I was hoping to get some tips or good training material to lead me in the right direction. I know probably most of you are self taught and it probably took longer back when y'all started learning than now.. I just wanted to learn from your experience and hopefully not waste time doing things the wrong way!

Again, thanks everyone! 3D is truly it's own "language" and it really does take practice to learn how to put things together and translate things in your mind from real life to the computer!

stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 02:58 PM
@Rednova


Uyy pero que interesante! Yo ahorita estoy viviendo en missouri pero vivi en asuncion por casi 17 anhos! gracias por el consejo! tal vez podemos chatear por el msn o algo asi?

Dale gracias!

nickdigital
10-08-2010, 03:08 PM
It might be a little difficult at first to see how this will help you but this thread has some good information.

http://newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=98754&highlight=polygon+table

Good modeling skills just come with practice/experience. After awhile, you'll just see how something should be modeled before you even load up Modeler.

Qexit
10-08-2010, 03:24 PM
Giving advice on how to get better at modeling is quite a challenge in itself. While there is a fair amount of good training material available for Lightwave, the vast majority of it is aimed at teaching the basics with a few specific intermediate level projects thrown in for good measure. Once you've worked through a good chunk of those, you'll find there's virtually nothing more advanced to get your teeth into.

By the sound of things, you are already past the basics so are looking more for pointers and hints. For that, a good option is to have a go at something that interests you and post your work in progress here on the forums and ask for constructive criticisms and guidance when you hit snags. The good old learn by experience, learn by doing it approach. The only thing to remember is when you get stuck or hit a problem....ask for help and assistance. Don't worry about asking 'stupid' questions since the only really stupid question is the one you didn't ask that resulted in you wasting a few hours banging your head against a brick wall :D

stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 03:28 PM
Thanks guys! I think that's where I'm at right now. I've got some of the basics but some little things trip me up and end up causing me hours of figuring out how to do it!

And I'll read through that thread now Ernest thanks!

pmwhite
10-08-2010, 03:33 PM
Hi Im in a similar situation to you, I found lightwiki Very Good & an eye opener for Sub D Modeling. i'm sure there is a lot of other great stuff there.


Hey all!

Thanks so much for all the response and help! Every day that passes I'm more and more surprised by how great and responsive this community is!!

I know that in the end it's going to come down to practice but I was hoping to get some tips or good training material to lead me in the right direction. I know probably most of you are self taught and it probably took longer back when y'all started learning than now.. I just wanted to learn from your experience and hopefully not waste time doing things the wrong way!

Again, thanks everyone! 3D is truly it's own "language" and it really does take practice to learn how to put things together and translate things in your mind from real life to the computer!

stevenpalomino
10-08-2010, 04:10 PM
wow.. that was intense ernest.. I downloaded all the sheets.. now to go through them all and study them :D

nickdigital
10-08-2010, 04:12 PM
wow.. that was intense ernest.. I downloaded all the sheets.. now to go through them all and study them :D

Lol...yeah, it would be nice if it was compiled into a pdf with just the important info. I don't think that thread is done being populated though.

JeffrySG
10-08-2010, 07:17 PM
You might want to have a look at some of my subd video tutorials as well. They cover some of the basics that will help you get started in subd modeling. :) They're free.

http://www.pixelandpoly.com/video.html

And really... join in on the speed modeling challenges. The best way to learn is practice....

cresshead
10-09-2010, 02:07 PM
going a wee bit of topic but what the heck is this happening at 18 min 30 seconds?
on the bike video...?

http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showthread.php?t=95181&page=6&pp=15

reading the post's it's "shadow box"
i'll have to update my zbrush n take a look!