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View Full Version : (mac user:) what PC?



rikardlassenius
09-21-2003, 10:32 AM
people seem to love to fight over hardware issues, so here's another one for you:

allthough i'm a hc-mac-user, our office is thinking about building a small renderfarm for lightwave animation from windows/linux PCs. what kind of machines would you guys suggest: chepo-stuff, custom-built, used ones - and - windows or linux?

what aspects should be considered? processor, busses, harddrives etc.

the cool rackmounted PC rendernodes that i've seen are around 2000, and that's way too much, i'm afraid. then we just aswell might buy G5's. or maybe the upcoming (soon, i hope) xserve.

hmmmmm...

BeeVee
09-22-2003, 02:23 AM
One bit of advice is to not mix render platforms. Because of the way PowerPC, AMD and Intel chips deal with maths all you images will look slightly different. Although AMD chips are the cheapest, Intel Pentium 4s or Xeons are the fastest available at the moment because of their SSE instructions set (which LightWave takes advantage of). However, because of the way they do maths, AMD machines are faster at hypervoxels... :) Have a look at http://www.blanos.com/benchmark/ for the fastest machines, and then decide according to your budget... :)

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Beamtracer
09-23-2003, 12:57 AM
Originally posted by rikardlassenius
i'm afraid. then we just aswell might buy G5's. or maybe the upcoming (soon, i hope) xserve.

If you buy an xServe you can save a lot of space. It's the smallest out there. That's money your company saves in rent. PowerPC based systems also use less electricity, and generate less heat than x86 based systems.

The first G5 machines have only just hit the stores. Currently they ship with an OS10.2.x based operating system, which was designed around the G4. Next month the Panther OS arrives, and beta testers already confirm a significant speed boost with this OS.

Consider the future, which is 64-bit computing. The two to think of are Apple's G5 and the AMD Opteron (Intel is out of the race).

2 gigs of RAM is recommended in a production environment. Although you may not need more than 4 gigs now, you may need to expand your RAM later in the computers life, as applications and OSs grow bigger. Only 64-bit systems have the ability to expand beyond this.

Jimzip
09-23-2003, 05:33 AM
Beam, don't say this:
"Intel is out of the race"

I remember hearing Bill Gates say: "Nobody will ever need more than 128k of ram."

Things in the IT industry have a way of changing very rapidly, if you haven't already guessed! ;)

Jimzip :D

BeeVee
09-23-2003, 06:14 AM
He was right in his statement, but not complete. He should have said "Intel is out of the race at the moment."

BTW. It was 640 KB... :)

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