PDA

View Full Version : Learning anatomy?



stevecullum
09-20-2010, 12:56 AM
I want to try and improve my skills in character creation, mainly creature concepts and 3d models. So I'm thinking that learning anatomy is going to be a good start. There is however a lot of material out there and not sure what is best. Where should I start, humans or animals? Thinking animals might be better as its creatures I'm most interested in. Any suggested books/DVDs?

TeZzy
09-20-2010, 01:35 AM
Honestly, you would never go wrong with starting with human anatomy

eliot goldfinger(sp?) has one on humans and animals

probiner
09-20-2010, 01:41 AM
I'll keep an eye on this thread to see what others consider, since there might be better and more recent books/media i don't know about.

http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Anatomica-TASCHEN-Icons-Angelika/dp/3822855103
If you want to feel like Leonardo da Vinci in a dissection, get this.
Wax figures from the Museo La Specola, in Florence. It has some pictures that might make you sick, but it presents the anatomy in volumetric way that makes the clean illustration books look a bit flat.
The pictures are nice, but they could be bigger if the pages were wider (5.5 inches wide in somewhat thick book that you find that you cant fold a page completly well)
I don't remeber if it as animal and compared anatomy.

http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Drawing-School-Animal-Comparative/dp/084160164X
I got this one (it's a heavy one) and i think it's quite broad
Big pictures, clean illustrations, lots of subjects. Compared to the other one though, things might look a bit more flat. And sometimes you can struggle a bit to understand what has more volume, or what is closer to you, or whats the orientation (well that happens with all flat images, but the wax models have specular light that sometimes give that extra info, i guess) it all depends what you looking for, a more perceptual or schematic view.

http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Training-Anatomy-Frederic-Delavier/dp/0736041850
I lend this one from time to time. It's about bodybuilding but it also signs the muscles used in specific exercises. There are probably better and broader books to the subject that are not so tied to bodybuilding.
The edition i have acess it has only men and women but i got this picture on google, so there might be other editions with compared anatomy.
http://loeildukine.blogspirit.com/images/medium_evolution.JPG

Cheers

erikals
09-20-2010, 06:12 AM
 
i looked at some dissection reference before, and yes, it's not really a pretty sight.
my conclusion though was that it wasn't all that of a great reference, unless you wanna be a doctor or something...
the thing is, it's too detailed, and makes it hard to focus on what is what.
also the muscles are obviously not flexed in those examples, making it hard to figure out what the real overall shape is.

i recommend illustrations instead,
or buying 3dimentional anatomy objects from 3D websites.
http://www.catfish3d.com/Category.aspx?parentID=5
http://www.anatomium.com/n-amed.html
http://www.foundation3d.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4584

for humans, this model from freedomofteach.com is also a great reference.
(hmm, website is down for some reason. looks like they are selling it on Gnomon...)
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/category/151/Anatomy-Resources

also if you can, try to get a hold of>
Maya Techniques Hyper-Realistic Creature Anatomy Part 1
Maya Techniques Hyper-Realistic Creature Anatomy Part 2
which includes great realistic muscle simulation

 

stevecullum
09-20-2010, 06:28 AM
Thanks for the resource suggestions. The Strength Training Anatomy book looks useful and well illustrated, but as Erikals notes, some of this stuff can get too deep!

I found this searching about:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/867/Introduction-to-Animal-Anatomy

Anyone watched this before?

Not sure, kind of tempted, but its hard to know if you need a good grounding in human anatomy first...

erikals
09-20-2010, 06:47 AM
...eliot goldfinger(sp?) has one on humans and animals
for animals, this one looks good...
http://www.amazon.com/Animal-Anatomy-Artists-Elements-Form/dp/0195142144/ref=pd_sim_b_3

erikals
09-20-2010, 06:56 AM
I found this searching about:
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/867/Introduction-to-Animal-Anatomy

Anyone watched this before?

Not sure, kind of tempted, but its hard to know if you need a good grounding in human anatomy first...

imo, you don't need to learn human anatomy first, the concepts are pretty much the same. when modeling animating a human though one tends to use more accuracy, more details, as we are so used to seeing the human body and will instantly notice if some deformations are wrong.

the DVD looks interesting, not bad for $40, but then again, hard to tell from the preview.
if you want to animate an animal, the best thing is to go out an film it, or/and alternatively get some national geographic videos or such. great reference :]

 

stevecullum
09-20-2010, 07:21 AM
the DVD looks interesting, not bad for $40, but then again, hard to tell from the preview.
if you want to animate an animal, the best thing is to go out an film it, or/and alternatively get some national geographic videos or such. great reference :]

Yeah that's probably what I will do once I get on to the animating. For now I want to concentrate on greater understanding of the overall forms and muscle placements.

I keep looking at the work of Neville Page and really like his creature concepts. Although they are fictional, they always seem to have a believable form. I'm making the assumption that he knows animal and human anatomy really well and can use that knowledge in his designs. So my ultimate my goal is to design an original creature and bring it to life.

erikals
09-20-2010, 07:57 AM
try to get a hold of this as well... Very good.
(darn hard to find where one can get a back issue though...)

ImagineFX - ImagineFX Presents How to Draw and Paint: Anatomy (http://community.imaginefx.com/forums/thread/298954.aspx)

 

stevecullum
09-20-2010, 12:47 PM
try to get a hold of this as well... Very good.
(darn hard to find where one can get a back issue though...)

ImagineFX - ImagineFX Presents How to Draw and Paint: Anatomy

Cool. I decided to buy the DVD and turns out to be the same dude that did this Imagine FX series and is basically an extension of that. I'm only on chapter 4, but so far its informative with some helpful advice for anatomy noobs like me :) It covers comparisons of both human and animal skeletal features, although his presenting style is quite cartoony and there is some silly music in places - it seems a little out of place given the emphasis on realistic forms and such. So far so good...but still want to get a good book as well though.

erikals
09-20-2010, 12:50 PM
 
ah, so that's why,... :]
i thought there was something familiar about the style... :]
 

wibly wobly
09-20-2010, 01:01 PM
If you have any drawing skills, do a life drawing. I did it for a few years and you really soak in a lot of stuff by just drawing. If it's a time crunch thing, using books will probably work out fine.

probiner
09-20-2010, 01:16 PM
Make a short review of the DVD after you've seen it and use it steve =)

banjaxedmdt
09-20-2010, 02:02 PM
try to get a hold of this as well... Very good.
(darn hard to find where one can get a back issue though...)

ImagineFX - ImagineFX Presents How to Draw and Paint: Anatomy (http://community.imaginefx.com/forums/thread/298954.aspx)

 

The official site has sold out, so the only place you are likely to get copies of that now are via a well know auction site that I hate to recommend (which I just checked actually has a couple for sale in the UK right now: here (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Imagine-FX-ANATOMY-Volume-1-JUNE-2010-3-hour-DVD-/290477479482?pt=UK_Magazines&hash=item43a1ce963a)).

Also worth checking out are classic Loomis books that you can download here: http://alexhays.com/loomis/

And if you don't want to read, you can get pretty much the same info in the Structure of Man videos: http://alienthink.com/ . The quality of some of the videos in the set is a little ropey, but the info is very good.

hydroclops
09-22-2010, 07:55 AM
I'd focus on human anatomy. All vertebrates have the same basic skeleton and muscle system. Humans make a good form to use as a base for comparison.

Why human for a base form? Humans are everywhere. As you learn anatomy you will be seeing examples all around you. You even have your own body handy.

stevecullum
09-22-2010, 08:21 AM
So I've seen the DVD and apart from the things I mentioned earlier, it pretty good for an introduction. There are comparison between human and animal and its quite interesting to see where we have developed extra bones and muscles to help us move our arms about etc...

So I'm studying a bit of both human and animal anatomy and interestingly when I try to sketch something know, I am thinking about its underlying skeleton first, which is having a pretty big impact on my results. Still pretty poor compared to most, but I'll post a before and after sketch a bit later for fun... :D

probiner
09-22-2010, 08:50 AM
:thumbsup:

stevecullum
09-22-2010, 10:46 AM
Here are my 'before' and 'after' watching the DVD scribblings. Neither are exactly great, but at least I feel their is a bit more thought going into the after ones :D