PDA

View Full Version : Got Talent



Teruchan
08-09-2010, 05:45 AM
Have you ever looked at some of the amazing work in the galleries here and thought you could never do that? Or have you thought that those artists have some amazing ability or talent on a level you could never achieve? While some artists new to a software package, or new to the CG world altogether, see such work and get inspired to do more, I think many artists see that and get a bit disheartened at their own progress.

What if, though, the idea of talent is a myth? What if the power to do an amazing work like that one you saw in the gallery is just as available to you as to anyone?

Well, there is some pretty compelling research being done that suggests that may, in fact, be the case! In this article in Fortune Magazine (http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2006/10/30/8391794/index.htm), the idea is put forth that it may be all about potential which everyone has, being directed in the proper, disciplined way. The idea that practice makes perfect.

What do you think? What would do differently in your own CGI art if you knew that the same quality you see in the best gallery images here is just a matter of time and practice to be yours?

Twisted_Pixel
08-09-2010, 06:08 AM
Terrence, thanks for posting this, been thinking on this topic a lot recently.
I do get that feeling of 'eek, that's so far I still have to go' when I look at some images. The thing that keeps me going though, is seeing that I have improved in the past couple of years. Just not quite as quickly as I would have liked.

biliousfrog
08-09-2010, 06:12 AM
I believe that talent is directly linked to discipline, education and perseverance. Anyone can learn to paint or play an instrument but to be great you have to have drive, be encouraged and also have a little bit of luck.

COBRASoft
08-09-2010, 07:28 AM
Without a talent, it will never be possible to achieve the ultimate look. But I'm sure everybody can improve a lot by practice, studying and trial & error methods.

aurora
08-09-2010, 08:33 AM
There's talent and then there's TALENT.
I agree that with discipline and a lot of hard work most people can develop the skills to succeed in most anything they want. At which point a viewer could say, man that guy/gal is talented.

Then there's the rare individual that is naturally gifted. They have a talented ability which comes naturally but even more they have something special inside that goes just a wee bit further making a piece a true masterpiece.

In CG its a little hard to identify sometimes but think about dance or singing. Sure people can take lessons and after working long and hard can perform. Then there is the rare person that is just naturally gifted. In the dancing case, they do not just perform the steps but they move inside the music, becoming one with it, transforming it into motion painted with the flow of their bodies becoming a true living piece of art moving the observer into deep emotional states which dives deep into their soul. That, to me is gifted talent that not just anybody can attain too no matter how hard they work.

probiner
08-09-2010, 09:25 AM
For me everybody got his talent, his natural predisposition, his discovered ability for something.
If some have thirsty to use it or discipline to make it grow or the applicate it well, it's a very differet matter.
I belive most people can be guided and practice to see things that were "invisible" to them, but not everyone.

gerry_g
08-09-2010, 09:54 AM
Well yes 'Talent' for sure but skill is key, every one who ever comes to 3D has talent but until they learn the skills necessary do demonstrate it they're screwed, and as for discipline thats just the rigor you apply to your learning process

Hopper
08-09-2010, 10:20 AM
There's talent and then there's TALENT.
I agree that with discipline and a lot of hard work most people can develop the skills to succeed in most anything they want. At which point a viewer could say, man that guy/gal is talented.

Then there's the rare individual that is naturally gifted. They have a talented ability which comes naturally but even more they have something special inside that goes just a wee bit further making a piece a true masterpiece.
I think that is spot on. It also depends on your definition of "talented" as it relates to the viewer's perspective.

I can take an object and given the right resources, reproduce it and render it with some amount of accuracy. It obviously takes some minimal amount of skill with the tools used, but not necessarily an abundance of "artistic" talent. My talent, if you even can call it that, is simply the ability to use rote learning in order to achieve the desired output. In my eyes that's not particularly talented at all. I look at some of the gallery work here on the forum (such as Otacon's or William Vaughan's) in pure amazement. Those individuals are truly gifted and have true "artistic" talent along with the expert skill with the tools they choose to use.

codyburke610
08-09-2010, 11:03 AM
I feel as if anyone can learn 3D, based off the fact that it can be taught; via the internet, or through an educational school. The one thing that you can not be taught, and is very well needed in this industry, is the hard work and perseverance that everyone puts into their amazing models. Without those two qualities it would be an extreme difficulty for someone to produce anything close to the amazing type of 3D work I have seen throughout the Lightwave community.

-Cody-

jasonwestmas
08-09-2010, 11:29 AM
Everyone has a talent for something specific. There is talent that is highly specialized, that looks super amazing and out of this galaxy. But you will find that the people that create this amazing stuff often don't go outside of their comfort zone. The ones that do go outside their ultimate talent will learn a lot more. In that journey they will fail a lot but in time they will develop a second and third ultimate talent. So even though you may be at a point where you don't like much of your work, just keep an open mind about your strengths that you do have. Don't pidgeon-hole yourself about what you think is your calling in life. . .lol.

So my ultimate point is to be honest with yourself and SEARCH within the STRENGTH of your own perceptions of the world and the universe. (I haven't been honest occasionally so I tend to warn and encourage people on subjects such as this). Your honesty is your greatest of weapons in a world of doubt, not because you should know when to quit but to be honest with who you are in your perceptions as an artist/ designer. It shouldn't matter if one set of specializations has more jobs in it than the other as long as you see a good number of opportunities out there for what you do. But even when you don't see opportunity you have to believe they are out there. WHYYYY?? Because it is arrogant to think that you are the only one who enjoys your work, lol. So my second point is that you have to enjoy what you are creating. There is a lot of voices in the world that want to take that away from you. Trust me I know.

Note: This is not to say that having a job you don't like isn't a good thing. It is, especially if you are providing for something or someone else. But find a way to avoid sabatage of your artistic vision in spite of all this stuff.

*Pete*
08-09-2010, 12:37 PM
there is a type of autistic people, called "savants".

they can, with minimal training and after only a short observation of something, recreate it in a sculpture or painting with amazing detail.


so, yes...everyone can learn, everyone can improve and most can become good, but few will truly master it...the more "talent" you have genetically, the easier and faster you will improve, but since time is limited those with more "talent" will always improve faster.

jasonwestmas
08-09-2010, 12:37 PM
For me everybody got his talent, his natural predisposition, his discovered ability for something.
If some have thirsty to use it or discipline to make it grow or the applicate it well, it's a very differet matter.
I belive most people can be guided and practice to see things that were "invisible" to them, but not everyone.

Yes, it's quite amazing to me personally how I can totally overlook how remarkable something is simply because I didn't look deep enough into a matter.

Sometimes it's not until I actually practice a set of skills many, many times over do I truly appreciate what is involved. It would be something like compositing some images together in PS or AE or texturing a different face. The appreciation and emotional experience of the process changes for every subject and gets multiplied by the times I perform the set of tasks.

jasonwestmas
08-09-2010, 12:42 PM
there is a type of autistic people, called "savants".

they can, with minimal training and after only a short observation of something, recreate it in a sculpture or painting with amazing detail.


so, yes...everyone can learn, everyone can improve and most can become good, but few will truly master it...the more "talent" you have genetically, the easier and faster you will improve, but since time is limited those with more "talent" will always improve faster.

Talent and genetics is also not the end all be all of success. Faith in patience and understanding of the tasks at hand are key. One could be the most gifted person but without patience and understanding (and support) the person can never develop.

Danner
08-09-2010, 01:10 PM
I'll leave you with 3 Picasso quotes.

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it."
"Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working. "
"Art is 90% transpiration 10% inspiration"

*Pete*
08-09-2010, 01:44 PM
One could be the most gifted person but without patience and understanding (and support) the person can never develop.

absolutely true.


when my grandmother died, i met lots of relatives i didnt know from before at the funeral.

the intresting thing was that not one (except for me) of them was what you might call an "average person"...on one side of the table sat professors, doctors (in many fields) and other with high educations, one even spoke 11 languages....and on the other side of the table sat the relatives i knew from before...the rock bottom of the society, all criminals, all with tattoos from prisons and all that...none of them had any form of education what so ever.


the most intresting thing with all that is that just about all of us had well above average score in IQ tests, even the criminal part of my family...my father has 160, which is just about genious level of inteligence.

so, since IQ is basically something that you are born with, just like eyecolor and bodyshape...you get it with the bloodline, so to say...so, it is obvious that those with high educations did utilise the talents they had, while my closer relatives never even tried....and then there is me, who is the only one who is atleast somewhat normal (meaning, not overly good or bad in anything).



so, yes...absolutely...without hard work, the most (potentially) talented person will never get anywhere, while a person with little talent can go far with hard work and a strong will.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 08:35 AM
160 isn't only just about genious level :) It's a high level of genious. According to Mensa genious level starts at 130-145. My father is up there as well and mine is in the mid 130's.
In an email correspondance, a Mensa representative told me, that if I wanted to be tested in an official test, I could pay them 400Dkr and they would include me in their next test in my area.

They also told me, that their online test is actually harder than the paper test (according to members who have taken both the online and paper test).

At present, I don't feel the need to pay 400Dkr to verify my IQ though.

But regarding your relatives at the table....my mother's family isn't the most .... let's say, academic people you can find in this area. They are very good at, well, drinking and brawling....and working their hard labour jobs.

Wereas my fathers side is the intelligent lot. Engineers, computer programmers (one is living in Oslo, Norway and worked on a MMORPG that I don't recall the name of... FunCom was the company) ... and one cousin has his own smith business and it's running very well.

Then there's me, a former army sergeant, who left the army and Denmark to become a helicopter pilot in New Zealand. Everything was going according to plan, when some turdface drove out in front of a friend and I one evening, killing my friend and leaving me in a coma, with more than a few injuries, for 2 months.
Obviously he, the turd, was one of a low IQ batch, who, while I was in a coma, contacted my parents and demanded money from them, because his car had been wrecked.

You can live in a perfectly normal world/environment one second and some retard comes along and rips it all away.

Sorry for venting :)

My talent is flying, but since I'm not going to be a pilot any longer, I'll stick to 3D as a hobby, being early retired and working halftime. Wooohooo :thumbsup::D

aurora
08-10-2010, 08:45 AM
I say IQ measurements is a bunch of crock. I scored high > 140 but in reality I probably function at a level of 40. That's right just above a salted slug. Anybody watching me struggle through my applied math projects will agree with the IQ=40 assessment.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 09:00 AM
:) IQ has very little to do with math. Anybody can learn math if they study it long enough.Though I was scoring decent grades in B level math in business college, A level was too bizarre for me to grasp without really digging in and studying, which I did not back then. I've since learned that it actually pays to do the work in school. But I was only focused on getting good enough grades to get into the air force, so I could fly the F-16 and that's what I did....apart from getting in that is. But that was not due to poor grades, it was due to high colesterol (got that from my mom). So I got a year to get the count below 5....I think it is...... without taking cholesterol pills. Turns out that was not possible. No matter how much I exercised and ate low cholesterol food, I couldn't get below that "magical" number 5.

Now....12 years later, my cholesterol is at somewhere between 3 and 4, because I swallow a pill every night before bed.

*Pete*
08-10-2010, 09:47 AM
I say IQ measurements is a bunch of crock.

yup...its like a score on how blue eyes you have.

unless you find a way to utilise it, its for no use...i never found a way to use my IQ for anything.

i also never felt the need for the mensa test for that reason...first, its useless, and secondly it marks you as a nerd.



edit: to bring us back to topic...high IQ is an advantage (theoretically), but only if you are not lazy or cant keep your attention focused on the one thing you should study.
someone, with less IQ but with more dicipline can study and become master in his field of work....and what is more annoying than knowing that someone who is obviously not as smart as you, is so talented that he/she can make you give up all hope to ever become as good....

*Pete*
08-10-2010, 10:01 AM
:) But I was only focused on getting good enough grades to get into the air force, so I could fly the F-16 and that's what I did....apart from getting in that is.

if my memory doesnt mess with me, i believe Gregg T-rex, the awesome modeller from Greece, also had a plan to join the airforce but had to give up his hopes thanks to some sort of illness...

it really must suck not to be able to fullfill your dreams.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 10:03 AM
Sure it does. But we're all nerds in some way.

The banker who sits at his desk and do banking all day long and enjoys it....he's bank nerd.
A soldier who thinks he has the greatest job in the world and know his routines in and out, day or night, hot or cold and lives and breathes for his job....he's an army nerd.

And so on.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 10:05 AM
Hmm, I talked quite a bit with Greg before leaving for NZ. He might've mentioned it, we might even have talked about it. I don't remember.

But it sure does suck sweaty balls not to be able to fly anymore.

*EDIT* Well, chatted about it anyways *

*Pete*
08-10-2010, 10:48 AM
But it sure does suck sweaty balls not to be able to fly anymore.


you think you would be able to do paragliding?...i plan to learn it next time i get time for a vacation...perhaps in Turkey.

it doesnt seem to be physically demanding or difficult...basically you just controll two handles (brakes).


not sure what your health condition is, but you should investigate if it is possible for you.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 11:08 AM
I have no health issues that pertain to flying *EDIT* or anything else for that matter :) *EDIT*. I've talked to an aviation physician about it and he said there would be no problems at all.

I am confident I could paraglide...and fly gliders or any other thing that flies, if it weren't for the cost of it.

So my two main obstacles are: Lack of funds and an, at times, untrustworthy memory. But flying the damned thing (be it choppers, gliders or aircraft) is not a problem.
The way I see it, is before any pilot goes for a flight, he has a plan of where he wants to go, a route to fly, speed(s), altitudes to keep to and radio frequencies to set and all that nonsense.
When one has all that on one's kneeboard, there's little to remember.

A bit tricky to get more than a desired destination out of a gliderpilot though (at least here in Denmark, where good thermals are few and far between, on a good day :lol:).

aurora
08-10-2010, 12:12 PM
:) IQ has very little to do with math. Anybody can learn math if they study it long enough.

If you're just asked to add some numbers, calc a probability, integrate to find an area, ect you are correct.

However in what I'm doing you could not be further from the truth. Studying the non-linear dynamics of human gait with emphasis on the stability-instability-stability during phase transition then applying it to robot models. Studying shock propagation in traffic models, molecular dynamics of neural networks, then there's all my astrophysics work. This is where IQ, as it were, comes in as it's a pure melding of creative thinking with analytical construction.

There's also people with raw talent. Example last semester a couple Aerospace engineer students were in a class with me. They were capable of solving complex integrations which required both Laurent and Simpson expansions with multiple branch points and branches, IN THEIR HEAD in just a dozen seconds or so. It took me and most everyone else in the class several minutes and a couple sheets of paper to solve. And yes as some might suspect they were both women. Damn them and their brilliant brains (yes I'm very jealous, envious and all kinds of other -ous)

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 12:26 PM
:) Granted, Aurora. I was only speaking form the college experience I have. Nothing more.

But generally, I think, if people have a genuine desire to learn a certain skill, they're more likely to acquire it (given that they are normal persons, IE. no handicaps or disabilities).

*EDIT* They will not all take the same time to learn it, of course. *EDIT*

zardoz
08-10-2010, 01:57 PM
I didn't read all the posts here, sorry.
I want to give my opinion on this topic. What I have seen before with new users is that usually they try to get to the final result too fast. If they want to create a jetfighter (nice avatar, cougar) they just create a cilinder some triangles, assign a few colors and expect that to look nice. When people understand that it takes time to create all the details then they get nice results. If a new user has the patience to take time to create something, it will be easier.
So in my opinion, is the lack of patience that gets bad results.

Cougar12dk
08-10-2010, 01:59 PM
Thank you Zardoz, but I only textured it :). The model is Mesh Factory's.

colkai
08-11-2010, 06:42 AM
I didn't read all the posts here, sorry.
I want to give my opinion on this topic. What I have seen before with new users is that usually they try to get to the final result too fast. If they want to create a jetfighter (nice avatar, cougar) they just create a cilinder some triangles, assign a few colors and expect that to look nice.

Dang you mean that is NOT the way to do it? :p ;)
The only talent I've got is for getting in to trouble with the missus. :devil:

Seriously though, the wife has natural talent at drawing, only ever bothering to even take an 'O' Level exam in it when she was past 30, then only because she wished she'd done so at school. Me, I can't draw worth a darn, anything I do, I work really hard at, relying on my bloody minded stubbornness to get it done where talent fails me, be it 3D or music. :)

zardoz
08-11-2010, 12:03 PM
colkai, I totally agree with you that some people are born with talent in specific areas, but I also think that most people think that can't do something and after trying or after being oriented in the right direction sometimes they get surprised with what they can do.
I have showed some friends how to draw using a grid and they were amazed with the results, or even trying to copy some picture by simply turning it upside down.
There is a very good book, called 'drawing with the left side of the brain' that has lots of techniques to teach you how to draw, and they really work.

jasonwestmas
08-11-2010, 12:15 PM
colkai, I totally agree with you that some people are born with talent in specific areas, but I also think that most people think that can't do something and after trying or after being oriented in the right direction sometimes they get surprised with what they can do.
I have showed some friends how to draw using a grid and they were amazed with the results, or even trying to copy some picture by simply turning it upside down.
There is a very good book, called 'drawing with the left side of the brain' that has lots of techniques to teach you how to draw, and they really work.

Right, there is a technical way to draw. It's only when someone performs the technical task several times over does it become an intuitive experience. Yet the technicality of it all will only give someone a generic structure. To make something appeal to the senses and feel genuinely attractive to the eye, a second layer of detail must be applied. This second layer is perhaps the final 10% that takes the longest to master.

colkai
08-12-2010, 05:24 AM
also think that most people think that can't do something and after trying or after being oriented in the right direction sometimes they get surprised with what they can do.

Oh, no argument there, but I'd class that as 'work' rather than talent.
To me, talent just "is", my mate is like that, he just automatically turns his hands to anything, no training, just BOOM, he's off. Hate him! :p ;)

But yeah, perseverance can make up for a lack of talent, I am doing things now in 3D and guitar playing I never thought I would be able to do a few years ago. Dogged determination and the desire to improve can be a good substitute for natural talent. :D

zardoz
08-12-2010, 05:43 AM
that was exactly my point (by the way I decided to learn to play the guitar this week...already got the acoustic guitar, but it needs tunning...).
but yes, there will always be people that you will hate just because they can turn any piece of crap into gold, simply because of talent.

My daughter is 3 years old, and she made the attached pictures...no one taught her to do that, she really likes to draw, and some times I spend time with her drawing...one day she did that frog, and the next day she did the small chicken (a pullet I guess). I don't know if she'll keep up this ability but when I was 3 I couldn't draw anything. So I guess this is talent.

Cougar12dk
08-12-2010, 05:54 AM
It is talent :)

I was fairly good at drawing, I never took any lessons in it, but my dad is good at drawing as well and used to draw his dogs (english setters) in different poses all the time.
But (I keep returning to that damned car accident) after New Zealand, I had less control of my right hand and drawing had suddenly become a difficult task. But it was my entire right side I had difficulty moving like I wanted.

But thanks to physical therapy, I now have my motorskills back.

I don't draw much anymore though. Nowhere near as much as I did in my early teens.

*Pete*
08-12-2010, 06:38 AM
zardoz....i know many adults who draw worse than your daughter, its really good considering her age.

Also....you sure the book was called "...left side of the brain"?....i find lots of hits for "right side" on google.

zardoz
08-12-2010, 06:42 AM
Pete you're absolutely right.

this is the one
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?expIds=17259,17311,25752,25854,25958,25977&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=drawing+with+the+right+side+of+the+brain&cp=14&hl=en&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=13986703260795851202&ei=IexjTMfyBce94Ab46ZmtCg&sa=X&oi=product_catalog_result&ct=result&resnum=3&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ8wIwAg#

colkai
08-12-2010, 07:33 AM
by the way I decided to learn to play the guitar this week...already got the acoustic guitar, but it needs tunning.

Completely OT but, if it isn't a "great" guitar, I'd heartily recommend getting it to a Luthier to have it set up, it can make a world of difference. Nothing worse than trying to learn on a "plank", the better the guitar, the faster you learn, honest. :)

colkai
08-12-2010, 07:34 AM
I keep returning to that damned car accident) after New Zealand, I had less control of my right hand and drawing had suddenly become a difficult task. But it was my entire right side I had difficulty moving like I wanted.

My wife is suffering a similar problem, she was diagnosed 2 years ago with MS and it's wreaked havoc with her ability to do her artwork. She tries to adapt, but I do miss the fine-detail stuff she used to do.

zardoz
08-12-2010, 07:57 AM
like I said in another thread, I have a coworker that had a car accident when he was 18 (34 now) and some nerve was affected, so he can't use is right arm, its only hanging, it's not dead he just can't move it. He wasn't left handed, so he had to learn how to use his left arm for everything.
He works with autocad and 3dsmax, and he is a machine. That guy can model really fast. So, from him I've learned that you have to move on, and you can still do your life after something as bad as this. I hope none of us has to go through something like this, but it is an example.

Cougar12dk
08-12-2010, 08:04 AM
I agree about the moving on, Zardoz. Thankfully I have regained control of my arm and leg again, so I can run cordinated now, but not very far, because I'm out of shape. I also draw fairly well... I don't draw much anymore though, just when I don't have a computer to animate on at hand and I feel inspired. I'll see if I can get some of my earlier drawings scanned and uploaded.

Cougar12dk
08-12-2010, 08:42 AM
A few of my drawings :) :

#1 is a freehand drawing I made one night while roleplaying, this was my vision of my character.

#2 is a drawing of Vasquez from Aliens. It depicts that point in the movie where she's welding a door shut.

#3 is a drawing of a pilot giving a thumbsup (a drawing I made from a photo)

#4 is my feet on the table in a summerhoues my fathers former workplace owns.

#5 is a drawing of a photo of a Mirage 2000 pilot taxiing past the camera

Twisted_Pixel
08-12-2010, 09:11 AM
Very nice work Cougar. Should upload them to the Sketch of the Day (http://newtek.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=235) forum section also. It's been a little quieter recently.

jasonwestmas
08-12-2010, 01:19 PM
that was exactly my point (by the way I decided to learn to play the guitar this week...already got the acoustic guitar, but it needs tunning...).
but yes, there will always be people that you will hate just because they can turn any piece of crap into gold, simply because of talent.

My daughter is 3 years old, and she made the attached pictures...no one taught her to do that, she really likes to draw, and some times I spend time with her drawing...one day she did that frog, and the next day she did the small chicken (a pullet I guess). I don't know if she'll keep up this ability but when I was 3 I couldn't draw anything. So I guess this is talent.

I drew a grasshopper when I was about 6 years old with oil pastel. Probably not my first attempt. I don't even recall feeling frustrated or ashamed, I just did it and it worked out just fine. Now days I struggle over stuff to get it to look right and get frustrated half the time.

Could be that I just have higher standards but sometimes I think way too hard to make something look good and in the process I ruin it. I think being more relaxed like a child is a great way to start things out at least. I can be harder on myself later but that is no way to start a project.

zardoz
08-13-2010, 02:16 AM
Cougar, I really like the vasquez and the one of your legs. Those two are really nice.

I guess that after a certain age, after seeing what others can do, you get really frustrated when you can't get to that standard. Kids probably don't have an idea of what is good or not. They have seen what others have done, but (at least until a certain age) they have no idea of what is good or bad. So they simply do it and have fun with it.
Most of us have lost the fun part of it. Money got in the way and ruined everything.

Twisted_Pixel
08-13-2010, 02:43 AM
Most of us have lost the fun part of it. Money got in the way and ruined everything.

This is oh so true.

*Pete*
08-13-2010, 03:48 AM
at first grade in school....i won a national drawing competition that included all firstgraders in Sweden.

Why i won?....propably becouse i was more creative than others.
All of my class drew houses, i drew Metropolis, a bridge. Car accidents, fire, running and screaming people....and superman flying in to rescue them all :D


we are all different...my wife is amazing when she is drawing something she can see..a photo or person for exampe, but i cant do that....i draw almost the same well as she does if i draw by imagination, but she cant draw anything by imagination alone...the contrast is enourmous, what she draws by referance is photoreal, but by imagination its worse than Zardiz daughter (no offence intented)

*Pete*
08-13-2010, 04:19 AM
one of the reasons i use LW, is that i can be more structured and diciplined when making my images....with a pen and paper, its impossible...it works like a drug for me and i have no idea of what i am creating untill it is done...a man can become a monster, a woman can end up as a train, a bird might end up as a ship in the sea....i have no dicipline at all when drawin freehand.

It sucks, really....but then again, i have Lightwave too....

meshpig
08-13-2010, 04:38 AM
Talent can mean both "natural ability" and something of the ancient meaning as in a Talent Quest: she's got talent as in big boobs; a measure of weight or a sum of money.

I think it'd be safe to say these days that Talent means saleability above all other meanings. How many talented people have you known who've excelled only to live in the pallid shadows thereof? Me, quite a few.

probiner
08-13-2010, 08:29 AM
Nice ones cougar.

I honestly think there sould be a thread for ppl to post creative things they use to dedicate to and somehow they got lost but never away from the person's heart.
Like drawings, sculpts, collages, Lego builds, etc.

You wanna make one? =P Oh wait, there's this on right here... (let me check my drawing closet :D)

Cheers

Cougar12dk
08-13-2010, 08:55 AM
Cougar, I really like the vasquez and the one of your legs. Those two are really nice.

The Vasquez one is also one of my all-time favorites and I'm NEVER throwing it away.... well maybe for a million bucks, but under no other circumstances :hey:

meshpig
08-14-2010, 07:12 AM
one of the reasons i use LW, is that i can be more structured and diciplined when making my images....with a pen and paper, its impossible...it works like a drug for me and i have no idea of what i am creating untill it is done...a man can become a monster, a woman can end up as a train, a bird might end up as a ship in the sea....i have no dicipline at all when drawin freehand.

It sucks, really...

What the F are you on about with this Discipline S...? Newton's concept of gravity got men to the moon but he was wrong about gravity.

All the calculations NASA did were thus mere drawings in the sense of making diagrams; so "a man can become a monster, a woman can end up as a train, a bird might end up as a ship in the sea.." is to the point.

Shawn Farrell
08-14-2010, 09:24 AM
I remember growing up with friends who could hear a song and then play it on the piano after the first time, this was when I was in middle and higschool. I had NO musical talent then and these friends were naturaly gifted. Today, I just finished my first 100 song volume in my music library. I'm 38 and bought my first keyboard when I was 15 and didn't really start working it until 19. Talent is sometimes God Given and sometimes you have to work it into existence.:)

meshpig
08-15-2010, 03:14 AM
I remember growing up with friends who could hear a song and then play it on the piano after the first time, this was when I was in middle and higschool. I had NO musical talent then and these friends were naturaly gifted. Today, I just finished my first 100 song volume in my music library. I'm 38 and bought my first keyboard when I was 15 and didn't really start working it until 19. Talent is sometimes God Given and sometimes you have to work it into existence.:)

I remember one day as an adolescent cleating my own height in the high jump. I'm a bit under 6' or was then and was completely astounded because had never attempted to before. For about 3 months I could just effortlessly clear the bar and added a few inches over my own height. Then one day I couldn't. There's the "gift", but if I'd been totally sold on it I would have worked at it but I wasn't. I too was one of those types who could hear a song and play it back on several instruments but wasn't sold on music either.

Like everything turns into an industry eventually. Talent used to be more a perjorative measure, of inferiority to the perhaps more credible regions of "genius", not taking the p*ss there either. What would any industry be without the exceptions, those who defy history and think for themselves?:)

stevecullum
08-15-2010, 04:16 AM
I remember growing up with friends who could hear a song and then play it on the piano after the first time, this was when I was in middle and higschool. I had NO musical talent then and these friends were naturaly gifted. Today, I just finished my first 100 song volume in my music library. I'm 38 and bought my first keyboard when I was 15 and didn't really start working it until 19. Talent is sometimes God Given and sometimes you have to work it into existence.:)

I have to agree. When I was growing up, I had a babysitter called Simon Bisley. He was able to knock out astonishing works of art, even at 17. He is someone who I would say had talent already exposed at the surface at birth, where as I really have to work hard to find mine.

Sarford
08-15-2010, 05:19 AM
Simon Bisley was your babysitter??? Man, that guy is one of the best comic artists alive. Do you guys still know eachother?

stevecullum
08-15-2010, 07:29 AM
Simon Bisley was your babysitter??? Man, that guy is one of the best comic artists alive. Do you guys still know eachother?

Yeah kind of. He's a bit reclusive, but I bump into him occasionally in the local super market when I go and visit my parents. His and my parents were close family friends, although sadly both of his have passed away now.

I've not seen much work from him recently, is he still doing the Heavy Metal comic stuff?

probiner
08-15-2010, 01:59 PM
I got a "Sláine" in my collection =P. I don't like dark and visceral stuff, but how to resist that art?

Cheers

*Pete*
08-19-2010, 09:16 AM
All the calculations NASA did were thus mere drawings in the sense of making diagrams; so "a man can become a monster, a woman can end up as a train, a bird might end up as a ship in the sea.." is to the point.

a finger becomes a character becomes a hand...handyman.

this kinds of stuff i do at work all the time (as soon as i find a peace of paper to draw on)...fast 5 minute sketches, the outcome allways suprising to me.

today i drew a tree that became...well, you see.

with LW it is easier to create what i want to create, with paper and pen im just an passive observer to what my hands create.


edit: the bird appeared of the lines i made for testing if the pen has any ink left...