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BlueApple
07-02-2010, 10:44 AM
I'm going to be doing some animation for television and was wondering if someone could remind me of the pitfalls to avoid.

I'm in the U.S. and am working with NTSC. I use AfterEffects and plan on using some of it's tools to interlace frames and convert to broadcast colors. I've been avoiding thin (1 pixel) lines as they can flicker/vibrate on a TV set. Anything else I should watch out for? Any sites that have a checklist of things to do when going from computer to television?

shrox
07-02-2010, 12:51 PM
I'm going to be doing some animation for television and was wondering if someone could remind me of the pitfalls to avoid.

I'm in the U.S. and am working with NTSC. I use AfterEffects and plan on using some of it's tools to interlace frames and convert to broadcast colors. I've been avoiding thin (1 pixel) lines as they can flicker/vibrate on a TV set. Anything else I should watch out for? Any sites that have a checklist of things to do when going from computer to television?

Motion blur perhaps, fields can mess them up, but photoreal motion blur seems to have conquered that.

nickdigital
07-02-2010, 07:54 PM
The AE blur effect "Reduce Interlace Flicker" can help too.

BlueApple
07-02-2010, 09:27 PM
Thank you both for the tips.

Silkrooster
07-02-2010, 10:57 PM
Hmmm... I am wondering how much of an issue this still is. Now that the air waves have gone digital and the push for hdtv, flat screen tv's, etc. Granted cable systems still provide the analog signals for a select number of channels. But it seams more and more stations are jumping all in. Some are only available as digital.
I think it would be wise to talk to the studio and see what their audience is using, most stations have done some kind of poll, take advantage of it. If you can provide your content as 720p or 1080i, you can skip some of that hassle. To bad the bandwidth is not there yet for 1080p, then it will be nice.

JeffrySG
07-05-2010, 08:17 AM
I'm going to be doing some animation for television and was wondering if someone could remind me of the pitfalls to avoid.

I'm in the U.S. and am working with NTSC. I use AfterEffects and plan on using some of it's tools to interlace frames and convert to broadcast colors. I've been avoiding thin (1 pixel) lines as they can flicker/vibrate on a TV set. Anything else I should watch out for? Any sites that have a checklist of things to do when going from computer to television?

Just be really aware of the safety areas on the frame. Depending on the tv set being used they can be pretty large. I'd do some tests and view them on some 4:3 sets to check safety areas as well as colors and overall appearance. A real check is very worth while even if it can't be on a studio ntsc monitor.

raw-m
07-06-2010, 02:53 AM
...and make sure your blacks aren't 100% black (16,16,16 is a good start) and whites aren't 100% white (235,235,235 is also good). NTSC isn't so good with highly saturated reds, so keep that in mind. As mentioned, a gentle vertical blur - 0.3 - can't do any harm either. Don't worry if it looks a little soft on your computer monitor, it's generally OK on TVs but check if you can.