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stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 04:30 AM
So I figured I'd ask everyone since it seems everyone here is an expert at LW and has been using it for quite a while and in a variety of settings. I was just wondering what's the reason you've chosen LW rather than "B" (B just being any other 3D package). Specifically in a production setting.. This can range from freelance work to feature film.. I'm just generally curious. After a few years of looking fir the right 3d app I've finally settled on LW for several reasons and was wondering what everyone else thought who's been in the field longer than I have..
Thanks in advance!
Steven

Mr Rid
06-27-2010, 04:46 AM
In every instance I know of, LW was chosen because of the price.

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 05:03 AM
Wow. How does it match up to other 3D packages as far as "getting it done" though? I know it's cheaper than other "leading" 3D packages, but does LW have all the tools necessary for studio purposes?

oliversimonnet
06-27-2010, 05:05 AM
i chose LW because of how easy it is to model in :)
and its nice and cheep to haha.

StereoMike
06-27-2010, 05:43 AM
In every instance I know of, LW was chosen because of the price.

In other words: Bang for the buck.

It's not only about the price, it's what you get for your money. There are cheaper 3D apps out there, but LW has a very nice and well informed community, lots of problem solving plugin writers and most (not all) of the stuff what you would need right out of the box.
Also, the renderer is great and modeling is pretty intuitive.

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 05:46 AM
ahh Alright. I was just trying to figure out if LW actually had all the tools necessary to get things done. I'm planning on opening a studio and was trying to decide if I would go with Softimage or Lightwave. Both are great packages. Any ideas? Kind of a biased place to ask, but I'm sure y'all chose LW for a reason over other packages (besides price) and that's what I'm trying to figure out. The technical stuff.

kahalany
06-27-2010, 06:29 AM
Okay, Let's get technical:
LW's has almost all you need right out of the box: A vast arsenal of modelling tools, Advanced shading, Character animation tools, Hair & Fur solution, Dynamics and arguably the most capable NATIVE renderer around. It does lack instancing which I believe is its biggest flaw but is curable via a 3d party plugin. Also, LW's workflow is a bit more destructive than other packages (no parametric modelling and limited undo functionality in some cases). On the bright side - It has lots of amazingly productive plugins available for free, and using the right training material is (in my opinion) the only professional 3d package that can be mastered by a single artist in a reasonable amount of time.

But that's just a side note to the real deal.

By far I think LW's strongest point is not related to the software itself - but the community which I believe is second to none. Since LW's price point pretty much leaves it the only viable choise for the independent 3d artist it growed an amazing user base filled with guerilla film makers whose drive and enthusiasm led them to harness LW's simplified set of tools into creating something which is much more than the sum of all its parts. That knowledge is constantly honed and kindly shared among the community. No question remains unanswered.
I don't think there's another 3d package to feature so many additions, plugins, nifty tips & tricks and words of wisdom for the price of a simple thank you.

You can check out my post at http://www.artstorm.net/journal/2009/12/lightwave-core-feature-list/ expanding on LW's benefits.

All the best,

Royie

SplineGod
06-27-2010, 11:22 AM
Ive used it and continue to use it because for the day to day, workhorse, bread n butter stuff for getting stuff done quickly its still a great tool. :)

nickdigital
06-27-2010, 12:00 PM
ahh Alright. I was just trying to figure out if LW actually had all the tools necessary to get things done. I'm planning on opening a studio and was trying to decide if I would go with Softimage or Lightwave. Both are great packages. Any ideas? Kind of a biased place to ask, but I'm sure y'all chose LW for a reason over other packages (besides price) and that's what I'm trying to figure out. The technical stuff.

Lightwave is used in my group because when it was formed LW was the software that the founding guys knew. So that was more of a decision based on individual knowledge versus comparing package against package.

That should definitely be a major consideration. Someone wouldn't choose a tool that they don't know how to use.

The "bank for your buck" with LW is a big consideration. Especially since you're looking at opening your own studio. Not only is the cost of a seat reasonable but you get unlimited nodes. If you were to go the route of having to license out render nodes that'll get lumped into the cost of your overhead.

One thing to consider is what type of work your studio is going to be getting into. LW is good as a general all around tool though it can suffer in more specific areas like character animation. This isn't to say that LW can't do CA stuff. 9.6 has added a lot of tools that help that. But getting an additional piece of software like messiah or even Blender might be worth looking at.

XSI is a fine piece of software. We've used it for CA stuff and then rendered in LW.

We continue to use LW because you can get a lot of work done quickly. And the final results are always of exceptional quality.

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 03:11 PM
Thank y'all so much for your input! That's what I've found over the years, usually the Lightwave community is so great in answering all my questions, and I've never NOT found training for something I wanted to learn more about. Really, that's something that's influenced my decision a lot because if I decide to hire more people, they won't lack material to learn.

Something I've always wondered is, what is this unlimited render nodes? Is it network rendering? I don't understand what it is.

Also, what would be the best 3 books to purchase to learn lightwave. Or maybe 1 or 2. I'm trying to build a library of learning here :)

Thanks again! :)

kahalany
06-27-2010, 03:34 PM
Something I've always wondered is, what is this unlimited render nodes? Is it network rendering? I don't understand what it is.

Thanks again! :)

Indeed. That's network rendering nodes. The exact number I believe is 999 nodes which is virtually unlimited. Highly cost effective.




Also, what would be the best 3 books to purchase to learn lightwave. Or maybe 1 or 2. I'm trying to build a library of learning here :)

Thanks again! :)

A definite must would be Essential Lightwave v9 by Steve Warner, Kevin Phillips and Timothy Albee.

As for Video Essentials: I, myself got up and running pretty fast with 3D Garage Lightwave 9 Signature Course by Dan Ablan.

Once you're ready for the deep dive: Pretty much every specialized content made by Larry Shultz, Timothy Albee and other fine LW phenomenons.

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 03:50 PM
Wait.. But I've also heard of something called screamernet? Isn't that the network render? or was that an old system?

kahalany
06-27-2010, 03:56 PM
Wait.. But I've also heard of something called screamernet? Isn't that the network render? or was that an old system?


Screamernet is just the official name for LW's network rendering system.

nickdigital
06-27-2010, 03:59 PM
You will probably want to invest in a proper render controller though. We used to use Butterfly but now use Rush. With a dedicated render controller system you can render jobs that aren't just LW (Maya, AfterFX, etc).

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 04:13 PM
It looks like butterfly is only for Lightwave then? It doesn't look too bad.. I'm interested in how LW "gets it done" in a production setting though..Softimage seems to have a built in compositor and a non-destructive workflow.. but is also about 3 times the cost of Lightwave.. could probably just buy LW and a comp package and still spend less..

So what's the deal with CORE? I heard it's an addon to 9.6 but won't replace it? How's that work?

nickdigital
06-27-2010, 04:36 PM
It looks like butterfly is only for Lightwave then? It doesn't look too bad.. I'm interested in how LW "gets it done" in a production setting though..Softimage seems to have a built in compositor and a non-destructive workflow.. but is also about 3 times the cost of Lightwave.. could probably just buy LW and a comp package and still spend less..

So what's the deal with CORE? I heard it's an addon to 9.6 but won't replace it? How's that work?

Well any package can get the job done. It all comes down to how proficient the artist/operator is and what the work is (how much you're willing to charge, deadlines, operating costs, what type of work you're going after, etc).

I would recommend a comp package on top of whatever 3d app you choose.

Core will eventually replace LW but that's waaaaaay down the road. Expect to still get some mileage out of LW.

Render controllers just launch jobs based on the command line executable and specific flags so they're not tied to specific applications (3d or 2d). Render controllers even let you run commands that aren't 3d or 2d related (DOS commands, email notifications, etc).

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 04:42 PM
Ah! Alright I see. Is there any comp package that works nicer along LW? Maybe in terms of seamlessness?

nickdigital
06-27-2010, 05:48 PM
Ah! Alright I see. Is there any comp package that works nicer along LW? Maybe in terms of seamlessness?

I think your main choices are AfterFX and Fusion. We use AE mainly but recently added Fusion seats. I think both packages are probably the same in terms of their integration (render pass and add as a layer in comp).

Cinema works pretty seamlessly with AE but LW doesn't do anything that's similar. http://toolfarm.com/tutorials/c4d-ae.html

There are some scripts that allow you to exchange data between AE and LW.
http://mentalfish.com/products/lscripts/
This guy has scripts that let you exchange data with Nuke too.

Your comp package choice will probably come down to price and preference. AE uses a layers system whereas Fusion is node based. One of my animators said Fusion is good for compositing whereas AE is better at motion graphics type work.

Mr Rid
06-27-2010, 06:10 PM
Wow. How does it match up to other 3D packages as far as "getting it done" though? I know it's cheaper than other "leading" 3D packages, but does LW have all the tools necessary for studio purposes?

LW covers most general tasks and may work fine for you, depending on the type of work you are hoping to attract. It is not best suited for FX, advanced character, dynamics, scripting, hair/fur (FiberFX is just awful) and complex pipeline management. Dense scenes can quickly bog down LW. Longtime LW houses have a good reason for switching to Maya when they come up against a heavy character project. The renderer is good but lacks in some areas compared to Vray, Final Render and Mental Ray. LW is also severely lacking 3rd party app support... RealFLow and Syflex are all I can even think of. There are many other cool apps that only support Audodesk world.

This always turns into a debate, but LW fans tend to believe LW somehow allows you to work faster than in other apps, but that is just a bias. They move fast in LW because it is what they know how to use (and got into it because it was cheaper than the big 3). I've worked with plenty of Max, Maya gurus that can produce at about the same pace or faster. And there are helpful user forums and tons of tutorials available for the other apps.

To me, the biggest factor to consider is job opportunity. If you are looking to get hired, or to take on production projects, or need to collaborate with other houses, most of them are using Maya. If you look for CG jobs on Creative Heads or VFX Pro there are zero LW jobs.

You get what you pay for. If you are hoping to handle high end projects and can afford it, then go with the apps that are the most capable and widely supported- Maya, Nuke and Houdini. As I recall, Maya comes with 5 free, floating Mental Ray licenses. So say if you have five, 8-core machines then you have 40 free render nodes for your farm.

stevenpalomino
06-27-2010, 10:19 PM
That's kinda a bummer.. It sounds like LW isn't that capable.. although I've seen the gallery and it looks like it is.. I guess that's pushing LW's limits?

GraphXs
06-27-2010, 11:05 PM
That's kinda a bummer.. It sounds like LW isn't that capable.. although I've seen the gallery and it looks like it is.. I guess that's pushing LW's limits?

IMO Lightwave is capable of producing high-quality production shots for TV, Film, games, etc. Yes Max, Maya, XSI are also very capable of producing the same, and are better at somethings. It's all about what makes ya get the job done, your budget, and talent. Having LW in a pipeline is not a bad thing by any means. Especially if you know LW already, you have an advantage of using it in your pipeline. LW does do a great job in a mixed pipeline, get whatever works for you! Looking at other apps as well won't hurt. I use LW for somethings and Max for others. Somethings are super easy in LW and some easy in Max.

All software has limits, use what best suits your needs to get the job done!

Mr Rid
06-27-2010, 11:30 PM
That's kinda a bummer.. It sounds like LW isn't that capable.. although I've seen the gallery and it looks like it is.. I guess that's pushing LW's limits?

Well, it depends on what you are trying to do, then consider the most appropriate tool. Most of the gallery examples are just still renders which is a different focus from animation, as is architectural visualization. Many characters are modeled in Zbrush, Modo, or 3d Coat which all have features better suited for organic detail. Houdini is the best general FX tool. RealFlow is for liquids. FumeFX is great for smoke and fire. Vue for enviros.

Lightwave is generously inexpensive for a good set of general tools, a solid polygonal modeler, and a competitive renderer. Maya and Max are more expensive (although not so much after you add in comparative plugins), but they cover more bases accordingly, and are more widely supported. I've never heard anyone who knows the difference, prefer rigging and animating characters in LW over Maya, Max or Soft, so if thats your thing and you have a choice, I dont know why choose LW for character work. LW is very solid for doing hard surface stuff- sets, vehicles, or a Mark 1 Iron man.

shrox
06-27-2010, 11:49 PM
For me it's ease of use. The modeller is truly faster for me.

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 12:06 AM
I just think it's odd becaucse LW is used by zoic in episodic television isn't it? I guess all packages cost around the same when you keep plugins in mind and all that.

Elmar Moelzer
06-28-2010, 11:21 AM
A few things:
Awesome, easy to use renderer.
Everything is in the box.
Modeler is still great.
Non nonsense UI, no silly icons, all text.
NewTek has an awesome way of treating their customers. The licensing policies are the most userfriendly of all 3d packages.
The price is also great.
On the 3rd party support. I am almost offended. There are quite a few plugins that are only available for LW. If you are into certain things like medical viz (or biology, or forensic medical animation, or anatomic drawings, or certain material sciences...) , LW would be your only serious choice (thanks to our VoluMedic plugin, which is still a LW exclusive).

Matt
06-28-2010, 11:25 AM
With a few plugins, Modeler is STILL very fast and easy to use.

Layout makes it easy to knock stuff together very quickly.

The render quality is very good and again, you can get results quickly.

So basically, speed, ease of use and a solid performer for delivering results quickly, out of the box.

The price was also a factor, but not the most important in our case.

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 11:55 AM
How does the LW renderer compare to MR though? I know it's supposed to be one of the best renderers out there.. is it good enough for a production setting though? I guess I'm just trying to figure out why it isn't more widely used..

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 11:56 AM
also, something that really bothers me is the lack of a "insert edge loop" tool.. or maybe I just haven't seen it.. the bandsaw and bandsaw pro kinda take too long if you're wanting to make several cuts. I'm not trying to put LW on the stand here.. I really enjoy the software and I'm trying to look into it as our software of choice. Any help would be much appreciated :)

nickdigital
06-28-2010, 12:13 PM
How does the LW renderer compare to MR though? I know it's supposed to be one of the best renderers out there.. is it good enough for a production setting though? I guess I'm just trying to figure out why it isn't more widely used..

Well we use it here so I'd say the renderer is definitely Production worthy.

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 12:16 PM
Really? Nickelodeon uses exclusively LW? That's interesting! What about more realism-type production though? Like product advertisement.. I'm not planning to do heavy character animation so maybe LW would be a great choice..

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 12:18 PM
What I'm wondering though is if LW can handle compositing type stuff.. realism really.. I've heard it was used in Avatar.. but I don't really know what that means these days haha.. Thank you guys so much btw.. It's a tough decision and you guys have been in this way more than i have for sure! :)

nickdigital
06-28-2010, 12:27 PM
Really? Nickelodeon uses exclusively LW? That's interesting! What about more realism-type production though? Like product advertisement.. I'm not planning to do heavy character animation so maybe LW would be a great choice..

No, the CG group in the Post dept uses it.

The other CG group that produces the cg shows like Penguins and Fanboy uses Maya.

The NTek gallery has some nice examples of more realistic renders so the software is definitely capable.

You could do a search on the forum for Avatar and Rob Powers involvement. I wouldn't do it justice by paraphrasing it in a quick post.

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 01:53 PM
That's what I was thinking.. Lightwave would probably be the best choice since we're not going to be doing much CA.. although there might be the occasional project but nothing too advanced that LW shouldn't be able to handle right?

On a slightly different note, does anyone know of a tool that inserts edge loops easier? or maybe a plugin?

nickdigital
06-28-2010, 02:10 PM
On a slightly different note, does anyone know of a tool that inserts edge loops easier? or maybe a plugin?

Could try this:
http://www.trueart.eu/?URIType=Directory&URI=Products/Plug-Ins/SwiftEdgeLoop

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 02:20 PM
Just what I was looking for! :)

Intuition
06-28-2010, 02:34 PM
Really? Nickelodeon uses exclusively LW? That's interesting! What about more realism-type production though? Like product advertisement.. I'm not planning to do heavy character animation so maybe LW would be a great choice..

I have used all the big apps except houdini to complete projects over the years. Lightwave, Max, XSI, maya, Modo, Zbrush, realflow.. etc etc.. you name it. Be it app , render engine or speciality app.

Mr Rid's description is pretty much dead on.

Yet, I will say that even though Maya, Max, XSI are more capable in Character Animation/rigging/dynamics you do have to factor in some things like render engine choice and possible plug-in use.

If you go Softimage and use mental ray you will run into render farm issues as mental ray is very expensive to run on a farm. mental ray is very powerful but also a little difficult to master. Vray is a staple here at DD with use in Maya and max.

Out of the box Maya is the most capable overall. It is why its used in pretty much all the features and commercials we do here at DD. Houdini is supplemented where it does better then Maya in the dynamics/particles/fx departments.

Now, onto Lightwave. Its ease of use and price point really determine for many hobby users and professionals alike that it is the right choice.

Even though Maya, Max, XSI etc have better CA tools and more overall power, the general capabilities in modeler/Layout are really great for generalist 3D work.

You can do CA in Lightwave and you can come up with great stuff overall. Plus the render engine is easy to learn and you get like 999 render nodes with a single license. This is why places like Eden FX do some work in Softimage but then MDD stuff to Lightwave for rendering because the mental ray setup would not be cost/time effective for thier episode a week schedules. In this case Lightwave excels and fits nicely into an overall pipeline.

Battlestar Galactica allowed me to do some max FUMEfx and some Maya dynamics here and there for output to LW rendering. Many of the models were modeled in modeler, with the occasional modo model by myself. Again these would end up in Lightwave for final lighting, animation.

I would say that as long as you aren't doing tons of character work where you need fur/hair/cloth dynamics all interacting in every project you would probably do fine with Lightwave. Now, thats not to say you can't do these things in Lightwave. You can. You just need to approach each part separately as multiple dynamics aren't that robust so... run the cloth sim. Then MDD it out. Then set up the hair.. etc.

Lightwave can do most things very easily and then is some areas it needs a little elbow grease. So even though you can get solution a,b, or c better in other apps you do get alot out of LW for the price.

I mainly use Maya / Vray these days but LW was a mainstay of mine from 1995 till around early 2006 when I started adding other apps. It has come along ways since those days. Don't count it out. I would say though if you can afford the more expensive stuff to at least try the demos.

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 02:57 PM
What do you mean when you say MDD it out? You can tell I'm pretty new at all this :P

Thanks so much for taking the time to reply! It seems light LW will be the choice for now and maybe I'll go with XSI and LW later on as we expand. It seems to be more than capable without losing render quality. Sure, it can't do some things as well as other software packages, but at least the quality is superb:)

Intuition
06-28-2010, 03:21 PM
MDD is a way of baking the geometry motion point by point. Its a point cache of the animation that you would get from the deformed model, no matter if its being deformed by bones/rig or dynamics, cloth etc.

Its the same method you would use to get characters from XSI to LW.

Its sad that they discontinued XSI's base package since it had all the CA tools for only $650.

nickdigital
06-28-2010, 03:22 PM
What do you mean when you say MDD it out? You can tell I'm pretty new at all this :P


MDD is a motion designer data file where your geometry animation is baked out to a file.

So using my earlier XSI example we built a character in Modeler. Exported the geometry out and imported it into XSI. In XSI I rigged and animated it and then exported out the animation as a mdd file. I then took my original model into Layout and applied the mdd file so I had my XSI animation in Layout where I could render.

MDD files have you bake out the vertex animation. Don't confuse this with transferring the position/rotation/scale channels from one program to another.

geothefaust
06-28-2010, 03:56 PM
On a similar note, if you DO go with LW and need more advanced CA tools and don't want to spend a ton of money, Messiah is more than well suited in the rigging and animation department, and makes a killer companion to any other application. :)

Ryan Roye
06-28-2010, 04:02 PM
I chose lightwave because based on other trials of software, its interface was easiest to understand and had the shortest learning curve. Keep in mind i've only been in the game for about a year and a half now, and my 3d production needs are nowhere NEAR the level that most people place themselves at.

No one will argue much about how modeler and layout as 2 separate programs is inefficient from a production standpoint. This, however, also simplifies the learning process by dividing the amount of information thats thrown at you by a significant degree.

Lightwave is also much better for lower end computers which gives it a snappy feel in regards to manipulating the interface (which is one of my top things I look for in all programs).

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 04:56 PM
I have a brother in law who uses lightwave as a freelancer and he's done huge projects for big companies and they are all top notch and great quality.. so I'm excited to get busy learning LW.. seems like it's all real technical.. any suggestions?

stevenpalomino
06-28-2010, 05:16 PM
Are those the same as these: http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/24hours_training.php or are there more on there?

akademus
06-29-2010, 12:47 AM
From my previous experience (10+ years) nothing yields quality results so fast as LW does. If you ever happen to have a situation where you need to complete everything from modeling to final rendering during one day, LW is the best ride for that. Most of the other softwares simply cannot do it fast and straight forward as LW does. Price is also a great factor. And LW rarely gets into way and prevent you from doing what you want.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 12:51 AM
I've heard many people say that about lightwave.. but it seems like I'm always fighting with the software trying to figure out a "similar tool to XSI or Maya".. I guess I just need to get to know the different tools and what they're called in LW

cgisoul
06-29-2010, 12:57 AM
I'm really glad to hear good things about LW and not just from Newtek forum. But also from experienced artists who feels the same.

Mostly, I am glad I bought LW / CORE. :thumbsup:

lwaddict
06-29-2010, 07:10 AM
Fast, cheap, easily portable, runs on just about anything...

and gets the job done.

Right out of the box, Lightwave's always been there for me.

I do miss the variety of plugins there once were but truth be told, I haven't really needed any of them in a very long time.

The higher ups have repeatedly been surprised to find out just how little it's been costing them too...
one made the comment, after an initial approval viewing, "Yeah, nice...but this stuff's costing us a fortune"
another, who'd been in the production area and had gone over everything with me just started laughing.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for having an arsenal of tools at my disposal...
"whatever works" is how we get things done here...
but Lightwave is generally the ticket.

NEWTEK ROCKS!

jasonwestmas
06-29-2010, 08:11 AM
Lightwave gets certain "styles" of projects done more quickly than other apps. That's the best reason to buy any application. So do your homework and find out how most people use LW and how that appeals to your way of working.

Titus
06-29-2010, 08:27 AM
If you want to make robots or spaceships, LW is your tool :D.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 12:35 PM
So LW handes hard surface stuff well but not organic is that right? I guess there's always ZBrush for the organic stuff.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 04:13 PM
What's the best way to render out passes in LW? Thank yall so much for your input btw :) its good being able to consult with people who are pros and have been doing it for years:)

geothefaust
06-29-2010, 04:15 PM
You can model organics in LW no problem at all, as well as hard surface objects.

jasonwestmas
06-29-2010, 04:21 PM
So LW handes hard surface stuff well but not organic is that right? I guess there's always ZBrush for the organic stuff.

Most people tend to use other packages for complex character stuff but you can do a lot within lightwave. Modeling is trivial you can do a lot of that in modeler and do complex rendering in layout. There are plugins for render passes.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 04:43 PM
$50.. not bad for openEXR high quality exporting.. I'll have to add that to the "Plug-ins to get" list :P along with FPrime.. wowsers.. looks like VPR will replace FPrime though in CORE? Looks just as fast. What do y'all think?

nickdigital
06-29-2010, 04:45 PM
What's the best way to render out passes in LW? Thank yall so much for your input btw :) its good being able to consult with people who are pros and have been doing it for years:)

Janus is the only option for render layers management.
http://janus.faulknermano.com/

djlithium
06-29-2010, 04:47 PM
Janus is the only option for render layers management.
http://janus.faulknermano.com/

I do it by hand, I get what I want every time all time and I find I can break out shots faster than it takes to do this with other tools.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 04:50 PM
How does the "doing it by hand" method work?

Lightwolf
06-29-2010, 04:52 PM
Great plugin AND ridiculously inexpensive. :thumbsup:
Hey, I saw that...

I'm just glad to see that you didn't write "cheap" instead. :D

Cheers,
Mike

Titus
06-29-2010, 04:55 PM
Hey, I saw that...

I'm just glad to see that you didn't write "cheap" instead. :D

Cheers,
Mike

This sounds like: mmmh, I should charge a little more!

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 04:58 PM
It looks like there are a lot of plug-ins for LW.. are they all made using LScript? Everyone makes it seem like it's simple to write your own plugin :P

djlithium
06-29-2010, 05:00 PM
How does the "doing it by hand" method work?

Pretty straight forward really. Understand elements in shot, understand required compositing layers. Break out shot based on lighting (not just layers), use exrTrader, render. Walk away :)

Done.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 05:01 PM
ahhh I thought you meant besides using a plugin :P

nickdigital
06-29-2010, 05:03 PM
It looks like there are a lot of plug-ins for LW.. are they all made using LScript? Everyone makes it seem like it's simple to write your own plugin :P

These are good sites if you need to look for a plug-in.
http://flay.com/
http://www.lwplugindb.com/

Not all plug-ins are LScript. I think some are made with C++.

djlithium
06-29-2010, 05:06 PM
ahhh I thought you meant besides using a plugin :P

Well there was a time were I was forced to not use render buffers of any kind. IT all had to be done by hand saving out scene files and turning on and off light properties and other incredibly huge wastes of time.

Thank the kats for exrTrader, even if 4-5 years go when it came out and I introduced it at one job it became a hot hot issue and confused compositors and supervisors.

Lightwolf
06-29-2010, 05:13 PM
This sounds like: mmmh, I should charge a little more!
Not for V1.0.
V2.0 (if that ever makes it out) - certainly, not by much though.


Not all plug-ins are LScript. I think some are made with C++.
The SDK for Lightwave is C based, so "proper" plugins are usually either C or C++ (which is easy enough to interface with C).
Basically, if it's a .p or .plugin(OSX) file then it's a "proper" compile language like C or C++, .ls or .lsc based plugins are LScripts (.ls files can be edited by the user on a source code level, .lsc ones can't).

Cheers,
Mike

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 05:21 PM
wow.. sounds like I need to learn some basic LScript and C/C++ :P

Titus
06-29-2010, 05:47 PM
wow.. sounds like I need to learn some basic LScript and C/C++ :P

I've found there are two ways of problem solving: the technical with scripts and plugins, and the artistical. I work with the technical, my buddies from the studio next door (LWers also) are artistical and never use a single script.

stevenpalomino
06-29-2010, 05:50 PM
Yeah I've found usually it seems like when I face a problem I'm thinking.. "i might need a script for this" and I know people who will take a look at the situation and come up with something I've never even thought of before haha! Those are the people you want working with you ;)