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View Full Version : Using Image Maps in LW 3D 9.6



kirkeric
03-29-2010, 02:18 PM
Hello,

I've looked all over for a tutorial on how to use image maps and have had no luck. If anyone can help me out, I sure would appreciate it.

Just so you know what I want to do, I am basically building a building that I want to look genuinely real on the inside and would like to place real images of wall material over my built wall objects.

Is this even possible? Will it conform to the walls where I've made indentations, etc? Basically, I want to like wall paper the walls. :)

Appreciate some direction.

Thanks,

Eric

Jim M
03-30-2010, 05:14 AM
Surface editor. F5

kirkeric
03-30-2010, 06:58 AM
I'm not sure if this was intended to be a sarcastic answer or not but I could have used some detailed information.

I wish it were as simple as surface editor. So, to be clear, I have used surface editor plenty with the existing surfaces and some presets. My question is how to use a 2D image of for example a wall surface (wood, plaster, or otherwise) and lay it on an existing object and have it wrap around and look real.

Additionally, I want to know if whatever process this includes, would it form to the contours of the object? For example, if I build a rectangular wall, then make indentations to show some form, will this also form to that?

I'd appreciate some detailed information on how to actually apply my image to an object. If it begins with surface editor, fair enough, but where specifically, how do I select the image to map to object, how do I apply it, best settings, any node type stuff, etc.

Thanks ahead.

Eric
Kirk Productions


Surface editor. F5

probiner
03-30-2010, 07:08 AM
eat this =)
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showpost.php?p=641873&postcount=3

this one is a good start
ftp://ftp.newtek.com/multimedia/movies/w3dw/lwbox.mov

Jim M
03-30-2010, 07:31 AM
Eric your question seemed fairly vague, so I assumed you didnt know where the surface editor was.

You apply textures in the surface editor. There are little T icons, which you click which opens up the 'channel' eg colour, where you can assign image maps. There are a variety of projections to choose from, PLanar Spherical etc. If you want to wrap a texture in a specific way onto a complicated form, you should consider a UV map projection. You create these in modeler. Alot of the time Planar is good for the job, but UV is the most flexible and useful (and occaisionally time consuming) out of all of them. Once you get your head round UV maps they become very easy.

JBT27
03-30-2010, 07:45 AM
Hi Eric,

Once you get into the Surface Editor, via F5, hit the T buttons next to each channel to add your images as textures.

All the settings for it should be self-explanatory, well most of them anyway.

First of course, add your images to the open scene with the Image Editor - F6.

Julian.

kirkeric
03-30-2010, 09:03 AM
Jim,

I appreciate your additional information. The post before yours, second link was also fantastic and was basically the tutorial I needed for this. Appreciate it.

Eric


Eric your question seemed fairly vague, so I assumed you didnt know where the surface editor was.

You apply textures in the surface editor. There are little T icons, which you click which opens up the 'channel' eg colour, where you can assign image maps. There are a variety of projections to choose from, PLanar Spherical etc. If you want to wrap a texture in a specific way onto a complicated form, you should consider a UV map projection. You create these in modeler. Alot of the time Planar is good for the job, but UV is the most flexible and useful (and occaisionally time consuming) out of all of them. Once you get your head round UV maps they become very easy.

kirkeric
03-30-2010, 09:05 AM
Julian,

I wasn't expecting the "legend" of Lightwave 3D to chime in as well but thank you very much! :)

As always, I appreciate the help.

Eric


Hi Eric,

Once you get into the Surface Editor, via F5, hit the T buttons next to each channel to add your images as textures.

All the settings for it should be self-explanatory, well most of them anyway.

First of course, add your images to the open scene with the Image Editor - F6.

Julian.

probiner
03-30-2010, 09:08 AM
a legend is right there on those videos :)

kirkeric
03-30-2010, 09:09 AM
We, that certainly is a fact. I would guess he is a developer as well? I've used alot of his tutorials.

Eric


a legend is right there on those videos :)

Tobian
03-30-2010, 09:14 AM
Hmm this is quite a complex question to ask, without showing us your skill level. Without being rude, you say that you have 'used the surface editor plenty' yet you can't fathom texturing which is not especially hard to achieve. So it's more to the point what can't you get to work. I suspect you are looking for a magic bullet solution, but there isn't one. It will take time and a lot of skill to successfully surface a complex object. There is no 'enbiggen texture' setting you are missing. :D

What specifically are you having problems with, can you show pictures where it's gone horribly wrong or it doesn't look 'real'. I am making an assumption (because I don't know what you are having issues with) that you are trying to make a texture do things a texture can't do, or you aren't grasping how creating a 'surface' works. For a lot of surfaces, you will only need a colour and maybe bump map, but for some you will also need reflection, spec, glosiness or even more exotic properties, and then it gets quite complex... I often see people ask how you create a 'chrome' texture, not realising it's a bit of an oxymoron :D

Asking for a magic setting which will make your images look more 'realistic' is a bit like asking for a button which makes your renders look like Pixar's, or 'add more cowbell' :D I don't mean to sound condescending, but people who know what they are doing tend to roll their eyes at questions like that. There are hundreds of settings and properties you need to consider to get things to look more realistic: Surface assignment and design, colour textures, diffuse absorbtion, Fresnel reflectance, BSDF light scattering distribution, Lighting and radiosity settings, and the dreaded Linear Colour Space, which hardly anyone understands, but has a HUGE impact on realistic lighting in interior environments. We also don't know if you have the right type of textures to use as texture maps: Using Photo's is usually a bad idea, unless they are carefully prepared! 'realism' is almost certainly NOT just by using texturing alone!

Post up a WIP, (with a link here for those of us who like to try and be helpful :D) and go through what you've done, what's not working, and people can make hints and suggestions on what you need to do to improve the realism of your images and suggest ways of doing your mapping. For stuff like wallpaper then cubic mapping can often suffice, but it's not as precise as UV for placement, but how good it looks will depend on if you have the right type of texture in the right channel, mixed with the right settings. But the reason it might look 'unrealistic' is you are using the wrong sort of image, or using it in the wrong way, or with terribad lighting! How to use the texture editor is a separate issue from 'realism' in 3D! :)

kirkeric
03-30-2010, 10:48 AM
Tobian,

You have a bunch of valid points. It would be nice if there was a magic button. I do realize this is a huge software to master so I have been trying to take it in bits and pieces as I need things. Usually what I do is rather than begin a project and then come to a standstill while I figure things out is I try to think of what I want to do, learn the procedure first, then do a series of tests.

So, I am in the series of tests now where I want to see what can be done to determine if it fits my needs.

Having said that, I did not mean to be overly vague but vague enough to get the general "here's how you apply an image to an object" steps and go from there.

A lot of good input here. The one tutorial left earlier is fantastic and was exactly what I needed.

Eric


Hmm this is quite a complex question to ask, without showing us your skill level. Without being rude, you say that you have 'used the surface editor plenty' yet you can't fathom texturing which is not especially hard to achieve. So it's more to the point what can't you get to work. I suspect you are looking for a magic bullet solution, but there isn't one. It will take time and a lot of skill to successfully surface a complex object. There is no 'enbiggen texture' setting you are missing. :D

What specifically are you having problems with, can you show pictures where it's gone horribly wrong or it doesn't look 'real'. I am making an assumption (because I don't know what you are having issues with) that you are trying to make a texture do things a texture can't do, or you aren't grasping how creating a 'surface' works. For a lot of surfaces, you will only need a colour and maybe bump map, but for some you will also need reflection, spec, glosiness or even more exotic properties, and then it gets quite complex... I often see people ask how you create a 'chrome' texture, not realising it's a bit of an oxymoron :D

Asking for a magic setting which will make your images look more 'realistic' is a bit like asking for a button which makes your renders look like Pixar's, or 'add more cowbell' :D I don't mean to sound condescending, but people who know what they are doing tend to roll their eyes at questions like that. There are hundreds of settings and properties you need to consider to get things to look more realistic: Surface assignment and design, colour textures, diffuse absorbtion, Fresnel reflectance, BSDF light scattering distribution, Lighting and radiosity settings, and the dreaded Linear Colour Space, which hardly anyone understands, but has a HUGE impact on realistic lighting in interior environments. We also don't know if you have the right type of textures to use as texture maps: Using Photo's is usually a bad idea, unless they are carefully prepared! 'realism' is almost certainly NOT just by using texturing alone!

Post up a WIP, (with a link here for those of us who like to try and be helpful :D) and go through what you've done, what's not working, and people can make hints and suggestions on what you need to do to improve the realism of your images and suggest ways of doing your mapping. For stuff like wallpaper then cubic mapping can often suffice, but it's not as precise as UV for placement, but how good it looks will depend on if you have the right type of texture in the right channel, mixed with the right settings. But the reason it might look 'unrealistic' is you are using the wrong sort of image, or using it in the wrong way, or with terribad lighting! How to use the texture editor is a separate issue from 'realism' in 3D! :)