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cresshead
03-21-2010, 10:40 AM
off topic 'self publishing books'

anyone with good info on pricing for such things?

been looking at lulu.com
http://www.lulu.com/uk/publish/index.php?cid=en_tab_publish

and
www.createspace.com

i'm finding trying to get definitive pricing at create space like trying to squeeze blood from a stone...they constantly want you to sign up
i just want a cost calculator!!!

really in this day n age i'd expect better and simpler to obtain basic info on websites like these..they all seem to hide pricing away...like where's the overview video on the services they offer?

anyone got other options for books?

PixelDust
03-21-2010, 01:21 PM
My brother is using Create Space to publish a book on boxing right now, and so far it has cost him around $2300 US dollars. However, his book has a lot of images and charts and is over 500 pages.

He said the cost also depends whether you want a custom cover, design consultations, and other services. However, he told me he is very pleased with their design people and thinks they are very good. He worked as a copy editor at a newspaper for years, so he has some experience with design.

You do have to be careful about your formatting. Create Space was going to charge him nearly $2000 extra after he had submitted his manuscript because his charts weren't JPGs or TIFFs - they were in Word format. I converted them for him, so that saved him some major bucks. He also didn't put page breaks between the pages at first, so he had to go through and add them himself (they would have charged extra). They didn't tell him this before he submitted it.

He also saved some money because he knew a friend from college who is a professional photographer and did the photo shoot for the cover for free.

He told me that he figures a basic package would be between $750-$1000 US.


Here's a link (http://reviews.cnet.com/self-publishing/) to an article about self publishing - no prices given, but some helpful tips in it.

Say, what kind of book are you thinking about publishing? Something on Lightwave?

shrox
03-21-2010, 01:26 PM
off topic 'self publishing books'

anyone with good info on pricing for such things?

been looking at lulu.com
http://www.lulu.com/uk/publish/index.php?cid=en_tab_publish

and
www.createspace.com

i'm finding trying to get definitive pricing at create space like trying to squeeze blood from a stone...they constantly want you to sign up
i just want a cost calculator!!!

really in this day n age i'd expect better and simpler to obtain basic info on websites like these..they all seem to hide pricing away...like where's the overview video on the services they offer?

anyone got other options for books?

The main thing that has deterred me is the prospect of selling the books. The first few dozen might fly off the shelf, but then I don't want to be stuck with boxes of unsold books.

cresshead
03-21-2010, 01:31 PM
i think both lulu and create space offer a zero stock option...and also 'buy your own' if you want some actual stock yourself at home or for another website outlet like your own site.

i like create spaces path to amazon store but they make finding out the true cost a tough job.
so far lulu seems much more transparent in their costings and even have a calculator so you can see how much it woudl be for your own stock to get printed.

banjaxedmdt
03-21-2010, 01:49 PM
Blurb is another one you could check out. They have a price list here: http://www.blurb.com/create/book/pricing

[edit] seems you have to contact them for bulk pricing.

calilifestyle
03-21-2010, 02:37 PM
In the age of the net. why publish a book. You have pdf's. The other day i bought a 31 page pdf for 10 dollars , On some great War hammer 40K tactics. He used Google check out. if people are asking for a book. Take the money you have been making from your pdf/online sales and pushing them toward publishing something.

biliousfrog
03-22-2010, 03:14 AM
In the age of the net. why publish a book. You have pdf's. The other day i bought a 31 page pdf for 10 dollars , On some great War hammer 40K tactics. He used Google check out. if people are asking for a book. Take the money you have been making from your pdf/online sales and pushing them toward publishing something.

It's not the same though. I like to be able to take a book off a shelf and flick through it when I'm bored or looking for reference, firing up a PDA, netbook, laptop or computer just to read a few pages or look at some pictures isn't very convenient. There's also something special about the printed word and printed images, I couldn't imagine a pdf having the same impact as some of my art books.

It's also a question of value. Sure, a pdf is chaper to produce but it's more difficult for people to take seriously. It's easy to think that you'll sell more pdf's at a lower price than a book at several times to price but a book is less likely to be shared amongst a large group of people.

Iain
03-22-2010, 03:30 AM
I agree. Virtual books are like owning music with nothing tangible and no sleeve notes to flick through or like drinking beer from plastic cups.

Books are an essential part of my life. PDFs are annoying things I sometimes have to deal with.

cresshead
03-22-2010, 04:57 AM
i also doubt the integrity of a ipad/netbook in a 3year old's hands!...a £4 book may get dropped/thrown..big deal..an ipad on the other hand?....eeek!

Nangleator
03-22-2010, 09:11 AM
The main thing that has deterred me is the prospect of selling the books. The first few dozen might fly off the shelf, but then I don't want to be stuck with boxes of unsold books.
You'd be incredibly lucky to get your books on shelves, and it would never, ever be in a big bookstore.

Self publishing is ideal for someone who has the means to market and sell the books themselves. Say, a comedian that works clubs. An inspirational speaker that gives talks and meets with the crowd afterwards. A software guru or artist with a website that can handle online orders.

calilifestyle
03-22-2010, 11:48 AM
Yes i agree that it's great and all to have a book on the self. But the point of starting with a digital version is to build your user base and fund your publishing when you have enough funds. The complete guided to Google wave started as a pdf. Now she's pushing out a book.

writerbella
08-25-2010, 08:38 PM
I agree, Google book search has now changed anything anyway - and when you can just download pdf's off the net for under 10 dollars. Besides, the market for digital book readers is heating up, as is the demand (and supply) of digital books including all sorts of works of fiction and non-fiction. But one eBook market that’s still stuck in the “great potential” stage is the education and self publishing (http://www.publish-book.com) market. Textbooks cost a lot of money, partially due to their limited printing runs. And they weigh a lot, which can be a problem if you have to shove a half dozen textbooks or more into a child’s backpack.

Silkrooster
08-25-2010, 10:43 PM
Text books is what should be digital. And should have been first in line to go digital. That is the only way for students to have the most up to date material and not have to carry a large load to class (I meant books). In fact, these types of books could be rented in that at the end of the school year they are no longer accessible. This would help keep sales at a steady rate from year to year.
Anyway just thinking out loud...

cresshead
08-26-2010, 01:19 PM
Text books is what should be digital. And should have been first in line to go digital. That is the only way for students to have the most up to date material and not have to carry a large load to class (I meant books). In fact, these types of books could be rented in that at the end of the school year they are no longer accessible. This would help keep sales at a steady rate from year to year.
Anyway just thinking out loud...

interesting on how far the Kindle has come...the latest one that's about to come out looks really compelling and it's the RIGHT price point too.

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/02/kindle/shasta/Shasta-GW-C1-uk-03-470x265._V184840756_.gif

dnewman31
08-26-2010, 10:00 PM
it's the RIGHT price point too.

I'm glad they finally started getting some competitive competition (redundant?) from the B&N with the nook. I like how the Kindle prices dropped within a few days of the nook going on sale.

Silkrooster
08-26-2010, 10:21 PM
I am thinking the Ipad is what is drive the Kindle's price down. No matter who's doing it, I am just glad to see it happening. The lower the price is the more people will have one. I am betting that the price will drop significantly possibly to the point of free. But that is way into the future.

inquisitive
08-27-2010, 12:21 AM
You know, I have many print books, and then I had to move and move them too :) after that I started thinking about ebooks.

I upgraded most of my tech books to ebooks and gave the print books away (still holding to some). Also bought some new ebooks and recently saw the print version and it was a very large book.

I use a netbook to read them and have about 15 ebooks now.

re: printing
I don't have costs but I know that some people do their own layout and then email the PDF's to Hong Kong, books are printed overthere and shiped back to the US. Quality has been very good (the ones I have seen).

The plus on PDF's is you can sell them worldwide, no shipping. - That was the plus of Kurv's download classes. Althought I do miss holding the plastic case.

Drocket
08-27-2010, 12:28 AM
I love books which you can pull off a shelf and I love spending time in books stores but I bought myself a kobo ereader a few weeks back and can see myself doing most of my reading on kobo now.

It is a no nonsense ereader, you need to hook it up to your PC to transfer books to it because there is no wifi, 3G and you can't browse the web on it, which is what I wanted, just a no frills ereader. I mostly use this - http://calibre-ebook.com/ which allows you to transfer your document to most of the ereader standards so you can take say your word document and create a copy for each of the different ereader standards.

Buying books online is easy though the drm is tied to Adobe.

My brother bought himself a nook; both the kobo and nook have good features and lack a few features too, but the nook is a lot heavier, slightly more expensive and battery life hasn't been as good - though this depends how fast you read etc.

I think the kobo was probably the reason the other ereaders started dropping in price, after it's release is when the others started changing their pricing policy. Personally I wouldn't touch an iPad for ereading because of the screen, proper ereaders use eInk which is a lot easier on the eyes and closer to reading a paperback.

The only real downer with the kobo and nook is when reading a document with lots of images or a pdf, I believe the new larger kindles are better in this area though you might be more tied down with the kindles (not 100% about this last point).