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View Full Version : Freelance Work. How to?



Tony3d
03-16-2010, 10:59 AM
I'm really thinking about freelancing with Lightwave. I was wondering if anyone can give me some pointer's on how one goes about getting client's? I feel I am ready to certainly do modeling, and rendering, with simple animation camera moves. I feel pretty comfortable doing almost photo realistic rendering. If you would like to see what I have learned I can upload images. Just want to know what you think of my talents, or if I wasting my time.

3DGFXStudios
03-20-2010, 10:35 AM
It's always great to see what others do. So Show us what you can ;)

If you want to do freelance jobs with lightwave you could contact some visual effects studios and ask them for some modeling jobs for example...

Tony3d
03-20-2010, 11:36 AM
Well, I thing I'm really more suited to doing products that character stuff. Here are some sample's

Tony3d
03-20-2010, 11:41 AM
Here are some more. Really just want to know if the quality is good enough, and also what needs to be done to begin freelancing, like sales tax, and federal tax. How is all that dealt with?

Tony3d
03-21-2010, 06:30 AM
Nobody has any input?

jasonwestmas
03-21-2010, 08:08 AM
Depends on who you talk to but putting some found objects or non-found objects in a narrative kind of setting gets many people motivated to find out more about you as a creative person. I know that narrative can be overrated but it helps people relate to your work. If you're primary objective is to show you have technical skills and can copy things, I'm not sure if that would help as much.

With that said I think your technical skills are looking great but take another step and put some more imagination into it.

cresshead
03-21-2010, 08:10 AM
renders look good, your modelling is good too.

do you have a website?
if not then make one and get busy creating a gallery that showcases what you can do.

If you can have a mix of types of stuff you can do such as products, architectural, medical,
transport, point of sale, characters, cartoon style objects and characters, icons.

my last freelance work came some someone seeing my building examples..for them to then contact me for some product cutaway 3d work.

in the uk [where i live] you can just open a business account and be a sole trader.pretty simple to do
just write down what you spend and what you receive and submit your tax return each year.

as for getting customers, you can always do some prospective work...see a company you'd like to work with and create an example scene and sent it to them.

gatz
03-21-2010, 03:02 PM
All of the folks that I know freelancing in the arts also hold full time positions. Side jobs may present themselves but rarely are they substantial enough to generate the critical mass to warrant dropping the full time pos. You have to really hustle to bring work in. And depending on your field and market, you'll have to educate as well as solicit work. Most clients don't care how you do the work. Pictures are pictures. The fact that it's 3D doesn't hold alot of cache.

Now you can find companies that have specific 3D needs (ie low poly UV mapped game elements, a collect of sprite cycles) but odds are if they use freelancers, they will require you work on site (at which point I guess you become a contract employee). If they use off site freelance employees there is a strong likely hood that they are former employees that have left on good terms to follow freelance dreams;)

My experience has been that former employers are the most reliable source of work. Now if your ambition is to establish yourself as a brand, creating a demand based on a unique style, all bets are off. You could flounder in anonymity with a style no needs/likes or can market. Or you could become the hot style dujour and live where you want and demand top dollar because every magazine/game package and TV commercial wants your touch.

rg

Sensei
03-21-2010, 03:58 PM
I feel pretty comfortable doing almost photo realistic rendering.

Photo realistic rendering is when you can't recognize that it was made by computer.. Honestly your current work I would rate 30% realistic. Learn how to make picture dirty, you will get a lot of realistic feeling this way. Make photo of some location, then try to reproduce it to the single detail, to level where you, and nobody of your friends, cant recognize which is which.. Print them and let them guess on party.

It would be easier for you, if you'd concentrate on making archiviz type renders either inside and outside. This way you can call/e-mail house, estate developers, people interested in renewing their apartments etc. clients that want to see effect of investment in advance (easier for them to get bank credit and funds).
Advertisement agencies either for newspapers and later tv, are also good place where you can find clients..

Tony3d
03-21-2010, 08:43 PM
Photo realistic rendering is when you can't recognize that it was made by computer.. Honestly your current work I would rate 30% realistic. Learn how to make picture dirty, you will get a lot of realistic feeling this way. Make photo of some location, then try to reproduce it to the single detail, to level where you, and nobody of your friends, cant recognize which is which.. Print them and let them guess on party.

It would be easier for you, if you'd concentrate on making archiviz type renders either inside and outside. This way you can call/e-mail house, estate developers, people interested in renewing their apartments etc. clients that want to see effect of investment in advance (easier for them to get bank credit and funds).
Advertisement agencies either for newspapers and later tv, are also good place where you can find clients..

Hi thanks for your input. I'm curious to see what you consider photo-real. To be honest almost every product I modeled here I own, and I must say most have micro finishes with virtually no blemishes or scratches. I fully understand what your saying, and I think I demonstrated that look in art's diner. As I've said I model mostly products, and particularly high end audio products. Most of these have very fine finishes almost mirror like. So I guess it's just unclear to me exactly how I should dirty this up.

3D Kiwi
03-21-2010, 09:23 PM
In my opinion they are nice images but they look cg, esp the turntable. All surfaces will have blemishes in them weather it be fine scratches, finger marks, dust. Its these little details that will take your images to the next level. If you take the turntable as an example, i would take a pick with a good camera from roughly the same angle you have now and then compare the two. (post them here to so people can help some more )I think you will see what needs work. Im no pro at getting photo real results but everyone is a pro and seeing them if you know what i mean.

Tony3d
03-21-2010, 11:03 PM
Here is a picture of a real Cary amp (different model). See what I mean about a pristine surface? Somehow that didn't upload. I'll do it tomorrow.

3D Kiwi
03-21-2010, 11:35 PM
Cool. I thought that one look pretty good, was the turntable i was talking about.

Tony3d
03-22-2010, 05:00 AM
I think the best looking one was the Cary tube amp. To me it looks like the real thing.

jasonwestmas
03-22-2010, 07:03 AM
If it is photo-realism that you are after then take another hard look at the edges of each object, large and small. You should see something that isn't there but should be. Also, it is an absolute must that you also reflect some sort of surrounding environment onto the objects, not just the object reflecting itself. That will make it more believable while using reflection and refraction blur wisely.

gatz
03-22-2010, 01:31 PM
Check out fake or foto to get an idea of how hard it should be to pick out the CG.

http://area.autodesk.com/fakeorfoto/challenge/

These results aren't exclusive to autodesk. They just happen to have a collection of side-by-side comparisons.