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a sandwhich
02-05-2010, 02:46 PM
I got lightwave a couple of weeks ago but I've been busy and I haven't had time to learn how to use it. What would be the best way to learn it?

OnlineRender
02-05-2010, 02:55 PM
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=104952&highlight=bible

dandeentremont
02-05-2010, 03:03 PM
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm109/papalive/best.jpg
First take some bread...

*Pete*
02-05-2010, 03:04 PM
by starting a series of small projects and coming to this forum for help when stuck.

start with items you have at hand...for example, a fork.

model it, set surface, set a scene, add lights and render...you will discover a lot more if you are not following a strickt tutorial, but go at it on a trial and error type of learning process.

tutorials are good too...but nothing beats accidental discoveries...making the fork you might try the bevel tool, or the extrude tool, or extend tool, or simply make it point by point, or by bridging boxes together.

making simple objects without help (guidance) from tutorials will force you to discover the best/easiest way for you to do it.

shrox
02-05-2010, 03:11 PM
Click, poke, prod. Try every button and look at every tab. You can't break it...

a sandwhich
02-05-2010, 03:37 PM
when modeling the fork, would you recomend drawing verts on a background pic or just eyeing it. Oh, and to reply to the you can't break it, I already did, but fixed it an hour later. Thanks

hrgiger
02-05-2010, 03:42 PM
when modeling the fork, would you recomend drawing verts on a background pic or just eyeing it. Oh, and to reply to the you can't break it, I already did, but fixed it an hour later. Thanks

It's usually a good idea to have photo reference. You don't have to copy it detail for detail, but at the very least, it will help sell the proportion of your model.

A simple object like a fork is probably going to be easiest made by starting with a box and cutting up and extruding/beveling the prongs and handle. Shape it as you go. Use as few points/polygons as you can get away with to create the form you are after. Then you can add more detail if required.

shrox
02-05-2010, 04:03 PM
...Oh, and to reply to the you can't break it, I already did, but fixed it an hour later. Thanks

Well, I guess I meant you can always reinstall...

*Pete*
02-05-2010, 04:09 PM
A simple object like a fork is probably going to be easiest made by starting with a box and cutting up and extruding/beveling the prongs and handle. Shape it as you go. Use as few points/polygons as you can get away with to create the form you are after. Then you can add more detail if required.


i would use only the following tools.

make box.
extend.
stretch.
drag.

..but its my preferance.

someone else might just do it with simple making 4 boxes, bridging 3 into one to make the forks forks (eh?..:D).


im suspicious of tutorials...i spendt a lot of time trying to adjust myself into someone elses workflow, only to realise that reverting back to my way of doing things is faster and easer (this goes for everyone, no matter the method).



A Sandwitch: ..first of all...cool name, watch out for Jin though.
secondly...the point with the fork (or any other, simple item) is for you to experiment...i would recommend eyeballing it, becouse who knows...full of creativity you might decide to turn the fork into a three headed dragon once you find your way to work with LW.

do not get overwhelmed over the massive amount of tools and functions...most of us do not need more than half a dozen different tools to create pretty much anything.
find your tools...and if making the fork is easy..keep going at it, let the creativity flow and enjoy yourself.

the same tools you need to create a fork, is propably enough for you to create any object (well, almost).

monovich
02-05-2010, 04:13 PM
I'd go to a school if you wan the best way to learn. You'd be in a structured environment, you'd have a course plan and a logical progression, you'd have time set aside for creativity, and you'd have an instructor guiding you.

I learned on my own, and its the equivalent of navigating your way through a maze by first taking every wrong turn. It worked, but its not efficient.

a sandwhich
02-05-2010, 06:48 PM
Ok, I spent the last three hours, unfortunatly, making this


and the handle is subdivided, but the prongs look bad when they're divided,
I don't know what to do to make it look good.

probiner
02-05-2010, 07:06 PM
Read this and practice http://www.lightwiki.com/Fundamentals_of_Subpatch_Modeling

And these are also good to get your head around sharp edges with subdivided objects http://www.pixelandpoly.com/video.html

Cheers

SplineGod
02-05-2010, 07:19 PM
Id say pick a project that will require you to learn various aspects of LW to eventually get it done. As you hit sticking points aski questions, find tutorials, books, videos etc that cover those specific topics.

JonW
02-05-2010, 07:21 PM
Make lots & lots of mistakes.

&

Watch all the tutorials.
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77002

hrgiger
02-05-2010, 07:23 PM
Make lots & lots of mistakes.

&

Watch all the tutorials.
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77002

The tutorials have a lot of great stuff but I might recommend focusing on one area of LW and branching out as needed. Modeling is as good of place to start as any.

As Larry suggested, you can try a project and ask questions along the way. Most of us have been there.

a sandwhich
02-05-2010, 08:36 PM
Thank you all, my typical method for learning new software is running through different projects till I cover almost every part of the software. I'm just really used to the flow of blender that I'm having trouble adapting.

a sandwhich
02-06-2010, 11:52 AM
anybody know of a list of keyboard shortcuts?

probiner
02-06-2010, 12:01 PM
see the shortcuts in Configure Keys Panel (Alt+F9). You will make your own after a while.
The buttons have the shortcut signed, like in :

W (W)
+W (shift+W)
*W (alt+W)
^W (ctrl+W

Cheers

JeffrySG
02-07-2010, 01:08 PM
anybody know of a list of keyboard shortcuts?

It's a little old but should be pretty accurate.

81945

...and if you do any subdivision modeling you might want to take a look at some of my free video tutorials. They might help you get started with them in lightwave. Link in my sig.