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CC Rider
09-08-2009, 11:00 AM
Greetings eveyone...
Looks like I will be making the transition from PC to Mac. Mainly because of those clever ads on tv...LOL

Actually, starting my own company and need to align my workflow with my new main client who cuts everything on Final Cut Pro. I provide turnkey video production services as a director, editor, cameraman, etc... and LW is actually a smaller part of my "skill set" which I am trying to grow. So the main reason for the switch is for Final Cut Pro, but I imagine I'll be working with LW on Mac as well. (doubt I'll throw out my PC just yet, but you know...)
So prepare yourselves for the inevitable PCtoMac noob questions.

Any words of wisdom/warnings/pitfalls/observations that are common to folks like me making the switch?

I am very savvy and advanced level PC user (A+, MCSE, MCSA, almost went into the IT field), but spent very little time with Mac in the past...as in, nosing around a bit with them in stores as I pass by...that's about it. So, "Thanks" and "Sorry" all in advance!

very much looking forward to finding out what all the fuss is about!

:D

precedia
09-08-2009, 12:36 PM
The switch will be slightly painful mainly because of muscle memory (where do I go to do X or what do I press to perform Y). Get prepared for that, but it eventually fades with familiarity like any new tool.

Purchase Parallels or VMWare and run a copy of your old Windows machine on your new Macs just in case. There is a boxed version of Parallels that comes with a USB cable and will copy your Windows hard drive into the Parallels virtual machine. Of course there is BootCamp, but once you start using VMWare "snapshots" (saving virtual machine states and restoring to previous states) you'll be thankful.

Purchase an 8-core Mac Pro. You won't regret the investment when working with LightWave or Final Cut Studio.

Purchase AppleCare for any new machine. You won't regret that little investment if for any reason your hardware fails (which it sometimes does).

Buy a Time Machine external drive and enable Time Machine. This will save your life over-and-over. Make the external Time Machine drive at least twice the size as your internal drive. Constant and worry-free backups; everyone should have them.

Purchase Office for Mac. You'll always have people sending you Microsoft Office [Word, Excel, PowerPoint] documents. Apple Pages does read Office documents, just not 100% clean. OpenOffice is an option but still not 100% interoperable. I've had no issues with Photoshop for Mac.

LightWave 9.6 for Mac is a little buggy, but I'm hoping 9.6.1 fixes many of the issues. Make sure you send in your bug reports. The 64-bit version is just around the corner; needed for high-resolution print renders.

You won't regret switching. In fact, many of my friends and colleagues have started the switch and are enjoying being part of the Illuminati (I had to say it).

Daniel

CC Rider
09-08-2009, 12:48 PM
Thanks!
Just the kind of advice I was hoping for...

I plan to keep the old PC around for interoperability with the rest of the PC using world (office and such...)
I do plan on going the 8-core route (rather than quad) and am expecting to be impressed.

do you think RAID will be necessary for HD editing with FCP?

:D

4dartist
09-08-2009, 12:54 PM
Heya man, I'm sure you'll enjoy working on the Mac side. It's a fun OS to use. I'm sure you're aware of some of the downsides people commonly mention. Lightwave has a few draw backs on the Mac side. For starters there is only 32 bit option available right now. So your lightwave will hit ~3GB of ram then start error/crashing on you. If you don't normally have really big scenes this may not be a problem.

Other things are the general lack of plugins for the Mac side, which was made worse by the switch from the Power PC Lightwave to the UB Lightwave. Old plugins didn't work, so the plugin dudes had to fix them. But now things are starting to catch back up. Fprime is working again for example.

Another thing is the Hub is pretty unstable for some peeps, so try it. If lightwave is super crashy coming and going from HUB then my advice is to just disable it by renaming the Hub file. That' it.

The older 8cores with X1900 sport some issues with Snow Leopard and LW. Tiny graphical glitches, when moving windows from one screen to another on dual screens they turn into just gray boxes. Then you just slide your mouse over them and buttons come back as the mouse hits each button on the window. Happens on Render Globals, Preferences, Image Viewer, or any other floating window. This issues may not be there in all the macs though because I have read of people haveing issues I don't and people not having my issues so it's iffy. So far it's completely useable, just some minor annoyances.

Here are some other new Mac user advice with nothing to do with LW. Time Machine is the freaking bomb, so grab another HD or external HD and turn it on. Basically plug in the drive, open Time Machine, click like 2 buttons and it works. I'm not saying it's the only backup you need, but it's awesome to have handy.

CMD+Option+P+R held down during boot, purges some temporary memory called P-Ram I think. If you get weirdness it can sometimes fix it. Like I had installed new video drivers for the X1900 and my second monitor was all weird looking like it was on an unsupported res, but rebooting with those keys held down fixed it fine.

CMD+Option+ESC is basically the way to force kill programs if you need to.

OK just thought I was give you some info that isn't always up front. I really enjoy using the OS a lot, and hope you do too.

Ah yes and I agree with above, the 8 cores are very worth it.

CC Rider
09-08-2009, 01:03 PM
Thanks for the advice...sounds like Time Machine is going to be a must have. Is that a Mac equiv of Window's System Restore?

Probably should buy a book or two for reference huh?

Was thinking I would use Boot Camp to run Windows on it as well...is that the best way for best performance or is it better to go with some sort of a virtual machine route?

4dartist
09-08-2009, 01:34 PM
I don't think it's like System Restore.

More like you can browse your files, and then when you're in a folder you can go back in time and pull out a file that used to be there, or restore a file that's still there, but to an earlier version. I think you may be able to restore a failed main HD from your time machine drive too, but I've never done it.

I use Boot Camp for 3dsmax, it works fine for me, but you do have to boot over to it. At least that way all system resources are going towards windows instead of both OS's. I've never used a virtual windows environment so I'm not sure how much performance you lose. It may be handy to have if you need to port over and do some small quick stuff. But if you're going to be working hard in Windows, probably better to boot over with boot camp. Just my thoughts.

I doubt you'll need any books haha. Really it's all pretty simple which is one of the things about Macs you either like or you don't.

CC Rider
09-08-2009, 01:58 PM
I don't think it's like System Restore.

More like you can browse your files, and then when you're in a folder you can go back in time and pull out a file that used to be there, or restore a file that's still there, but to an earlier version. I think you may be able to restore a failed main HD from your time machine drive too, but I've never done it.


Oh cool...so not like System Restore at all, which is an all or nothing proposition. Here you can restore a single file to to the state of your choice. Billiant!

so who makes the best antivirus software for Mac? ;D


JK

Kuzey
09-08-2009, 02:15 PM
This is a great site for any Mac related questions:

http://discussions.apple.com/

Kuzey

JonW
09-08-2009, 04:48 PM
This site maybe of some help.

http://macperformanceguide.com/Mac-MacProMemory.html

Kuzey
09-08-2009, 05:09 PM
If you like unix then this is great as well:

http://www.osxfaq.com/tutorials/LearningCenter/

Kuzey

precedia
09-08-2009, 05:57 PM
do you think RAID will be necessary for HD editing with FCP?

It depends. I don't use a RAID system and I've had no problems editing in Final Cut Pro. I just store my data on a Firewire 800 external drive and on an internal SATA drive.

I've read that if you use DVCPRO HD you also don't really need RAID, but it's good to have a fast 7200 rpm drive.

Other video formats I've read may require having the data on a RAID drive set.

Look into what formats you will be using and a quick Google search will tell you if you need to invest in RAID or not.

For data redundancy and back-up it doesn't hurt to mirror your drive or place it into a RAID stack if you're paranoid about drive failure. I've had quite a few drives fail on me over the years, hence why you should always be running Time Machine.

Mirroring is built into Mac OS X, but I do not believe you can mirror your boot volume, so make sure the data you want mirrored is stored on a second/third drive set.

Daniel

avkills
09-08-2009, 06:51 PM
If you are going to be doing any work in ProRes422 or uncompressed HD, then you will need a RAID if you plan on having to play it back in real time.

A FW800 or eSATA single drive would probably be fine for 720p work, but it will choke on the higher bit rate 1080 stuff.

-mark

OlaHaldor
09-08-2009, 09:58 PM
I've never used uncompressed video. Prores 422 HQ is the only thing I work with and deliver. Not 110% perfect, but it does the job quite well. Offers speed AND quality.

I have yet to encounter choppy frame rates using Prores 422 codecs from a single 7200rpm hard drive. RED RAW on the other hand is a beast in general, and a couple of hard drives RAID0 can't handle it... But I mostly do color grading, so there's no real-time playback, not even in SD, so it's not a problem at all..


I actually found the transition with LW from PC to Mac early this year quite amusing. Been a Mac user for half a decade, but never used LW on it before january this year. And I love it!

ONLY pitfall is: those fancy plugins you want are usually written for either PPC or Windows, which is a pain in the ***. When there's no Mac version, I nag and rant about it till my head pops.. *sigh* So if you need a tip on how to rant and nag an yell and be an angry little LightWave user, just name the word, and I'll teach 'ya! ;)

When I get mad because of the lack of a LW plugin I REALLY NEED, I think of myself as these....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXJLlTrzQ4M

Mr Rid
09-09-2009, 02:55 AM
Where I work, they bought all MacPro workstations in order to cover all bases. The 3D department runs LW and whatever Windows apps in Vista under Boot Camp. 2D and production can use whichever compositing or editing app in either platform they want. At night I switch any Macs over to Windows for the 3D render farm. Works out just dandy.

Yamba
09-09-2009, 05:35 AM
I've never used uncompressed video. Prores 422 HQ is the only thing I work with and deliver. Not 110% perfect, but it does the job quite well. Offers speed AND quality.

I have yet to encounter choppy frame rates using Prores 422 codecs from a single 7200rpm hard drive. ]

Ditto. No Drama cutting with ProRes 422 HQ.

Shane

BigHache
09-09-2009, 11:50 AM
Ditto. No Drama cutting with ProRes 422 HQ.

Shane

As well here. I recently moved from a DVCAM environment to a ProRes 422 HQ environment and it's been swell. 99% of our deliverables are SD though. We have an AJA IO HD but I've yet to put it to some real use.

dwburman
09-09-2009, 12:40 PM
One thing OS X does differently than Windows is the way applications can be open when all the windows are closed. For instance, Firefox might still be loaded and running with no browser windows open. I occasionally cycle through all the open apps and close them. This is simply done by hitting command-tab to switch to the app (like alt-tab on windows) and (keeping the command key held down) hit q for quit (cmd-q). (the command key is the one with the apple on it. (think of it as the ctrl key on the PC unless you're in Lightwave in which case the ctrl key IS the ctrl key :)

By default OS X has the Function keys set up for Exposť (a nice feature for finding the right window or panel when you have lots of them on the screen) that can interfere with FCP and LW. I like to change the shortcuts from their defaults (F9-F12) to cmd-shift F9, etc. If you don't care about using the function keys in FCP (F10 for overlay video clip instead of you having to drag it with the mouse) there is a 'Special' Menu in LW with a "Use Macintosh Keys" that may let you hit F9 without changing the Preferences for the whole computer.

One guy on this forum who was trying out a Mac accidentally deleted an app from the HDD because he dragged it's icon to the desktop and then into the trash thinking that it was just a shortcut so be aware of that. To make a shortcut, hold cmd-opt while dragging.

You can hide the app you're using by option-clicking on something else (desktop, window from another app). Sometimes this happens accidentally and you might think the program crashed. Just cmd-tab to the apps icon or click on its icon in the dock and the app will pop back up.

OS X is based on unix so you can open a shell (terminal) and do some mischief that way if you're so inclined.

CC Rider
09-09-2009, 01:30 PM
Thanks for all the replies ... this is going to be a big help.
Its been years learning the nuances of Windows over the years and still uncover new ones. No doubt Mac will be a similar experience. Probably learn a lot of them the "hard way".

:D

toby
09-09-2009, 05:48 PM
so who makes the best antivirus software for Mac?
I've never used it - but I don't run a business with mine, so maybe they do just to be safe?

Scazzino
09-09-2009, 08:50 PM
...so who makes the best antivirus software for Mac? ;D

Apple does, it's called Mac OS X... ;)

Fortune: Why are there no Mac viruses? (http://brainstormtech.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2009/09/02/why-are-there-no-mac-viruses/)

:thumbsup:

CC Rider
09-10-2009, 05:25 AM
Apple does, it's called Mac OS X... ;)

Fortune: Why are there no Mac viruses? (http://brainstormtech.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2009/09/02/why-are-there-no-mac-viruses/)

:thumbsup:

LOL

That's actually the response I was expecting...
I wouldn't consider using a resource hog like antivirus while trying to edit or render...
Virus attacks are one thing I'm really not going to miss about PCs

:D

4dartist
09-10-2009, 08:11 AM
Ya after starting work at this company a few years ago, I can't say I've seen one virus or annoying spyware. I hope that doesn't change.

Another thing I don't see many mac people using is CMD+Space for spotlight. I think one of the most powerful aspects of OSX is the extreme fast searching. Say you want to open an FTP program called Cyberduck, but it's all the way in the app folder and you don't have a shortcut to it. Just hit CMD+Space type in Cyber.. and it'll find it before you finish typing. Then just hit enter and it's running. Love it.

avkills
09-10-2009, 08:15 AM
As well here. I recently moved from a DVCAM environment to a ProRes 422 HQ environment and it's been swell. 99% of our deliverables are SD though. We have an AJA IO HD but I've yet to put it to some real use.

Of course a single drive is going to be fine for SD. I think you *might* run into trouble using ProRes 422 HQ at 1080p @ 24,30 or 60fps, which would be the most data, roughly 100+ MB/sec. AJA tech support told me not to use our FW800 drives (which are 2 drive G-RAIDs) if I was going to be using HD ProRes codecs; so we bought a eSATA 4 drive RAID.

-mark

Limbus
09-10-2009, 08:31 AM
One pitfall I can think of is the strange behaviour when droping folders. If you have 2 folders with the same name, and copy one onto the other, the contents of the moving folder overwrite the contents of the target folder. On Windows (and everywhere else as well), the content is merged.

If you are a user of Total Commander, Dopus or any other advanced file manager on windows, check out PathFinder. Its a nice replacement for the build in Finder. Also make sure to get "Default Folder X". Its a enhancement for the File requestor and will make your life so much easyer.

Have fun with the new machine.

Cheers, Florian

avkills
09-10-2009, 12:09 PM
One pitfall I can think of is the strange behaviour when droping folders. If you have 2 folders with the same name, and copy one onto the other, the contents of the moving folder overwrite the contents of the target folder. On Windows (and everywhere else as well), the content is merged.

If you are a user of Total Commander, Dopus or any other advanced file manager on windows, check out PathFinder. Its a nice replacement for the build in Finder. Also make sure to get "Default Folder X". Its a enhancement for the File requestor and will make your life so much easyer.

Have fun with the new machine.

Cheers, Florian

I would go along with the fact that it should overwrite it as well; but maybe that is because I've never really done the Windows or Unix thing and do not remember what AmigaDOS did.

Maybe Apple should have a pop-up that asks what you want to do; that would be cool.

-mark

Limbus
09-10-2009, 12:13 PM
I would go along with the fact that it should overwrite it as well; but maybe that is because I've never really done the Windows or Unix thing and do not remember what AmigaDOS did.


I think it is the wrong behaviour because:

1. all other systems do it the other way
2. it leads to data loss while merging folders does not
3. the Mac OS X Terminal command mv does a merge not a replace so its inconsistent

Cheers, Florian

Mr Rid
09-10-2009, 03:01 PM
I really think a lot of software glitches are confused with viruses. In the last 13 years, Ive owned about 15 different computers (1 Mac), and I have never had any virus protection. *gasp*! I have always downloaded crap willy-nilly and yet have never had a virus. What I do experience endlessly are incompatibility issues that lead to all manner of weird problems that have nothing to do with viruses.

4dartist
09-10-2009, 03:04 PM
I would agree with that about viruses, although my PC virus software has found quite a few attachments that are infected. However, you can't say that you have never had run in's in spyware?! I have reformatted/installed some many friends PC's because they were kicked in the nuts by spyware.

Mr Rid
09-10-2009, 07:27 PM
My wife thinks every computer glitch must be a virus and she makes me run scans. Occasionally the virus scan find things that it suspects are trojans or whatever, but are really just some part of how a legitimate program works.

Yeah I do turn up spywares but they never interfered in any way that I could tell before I removed them.

I recently tried installing AVG anti-virus which totally stank as it brought my internet and network connection to a crawl, and it ran some ram intensive process even after exiting the program. I was advised to install a newer version of it which only made my computer blue-screen daily until I uninstalled it. Support was no help.

But I have far more problems with just upgrading or installing anything as it often leads to some incompatibility issue that is difficult or impossible to track down, just like with the AVG example, whereas a lot of people would probably think they had a virus and go nuts reformatting.

archijam
09-11-2009, 12:49 AM
My biggest slow-down was the shift to an apple keyboard, and the resulting change in LW shortcuts, regardless of how I tried to update them.

Consider keeping a PC (Like) keyboard for the transition phase. And install bootcamp, you never know when you might need one of those obscure japanese plugins to work .. ;)

Slick Systems
09-25-2009, 02:33 AM
I think you'll grow to love the mac, I have been using macs since college (many years ago) what hooked me into them was the simplicity and ease of use. At the time pc's were on win 3.1 and DOS was a frequent sight. I remember trying to do simple things on the pc like get a sound card to work correctly with a piece of software and it was a nightmare setting the IRQ's constantly being presented with menu's asking which card do I have etc etc.. the mac just worked no more wasted time messing around trying to get things working... and I haven't looked back since. Networking macs is also many times easier than pc's they're virtually plug and play, also wireless stuff is simplicity itself. Oh and forget about Viruses the only thing I have ever suffered from are spam mail and the common cold mainly that's been my own silly fault for visiting some dodgy website or signing up for a silly newsletter, be sensible and you won't suffer any probs.

That's not to say I don't use them, I just prefer the mac environment and it is very customisable if you want it to be especially now it has the BSD back end, terminal can be extremely useful at times. Snow Leopard promises much and provides true 64Bit computing when all the apps catch up. (oh and say goodbye to super expensive system update purchases)

Some simple yet overlooked key commands: apple-s (save file), apple-shift-s (Save as), apple-i (Get info when in finder and a file is selected), apple-option-i (show inspector), apple-shift-3 or 4 (Screenshot and selected screenshot), apple-s (on startup allows access to BSD single user mode), apple-w (in finder closes window), apple-option-w (close all windows), space (gives quickview of file), apple-n (new finder window), apple-shift-n (new folder). A lot of things are drag and drop too so if you're struggling to find a command for insertion try just drag and drop.

Always experiment with the modifier keys eg apple/option/shift/control (sometimes option is also the alt key) as these provide access to other shortcuts in most programs. Control clicking is very useful for getting contextual menus in various progs and I'm sure Final Cut will definitely use them. Control clicking on icons in the dock will provide access to useful program features. Double clicking on a window title bar will collapse it into the dock. Spaces will be a useful feature if you like running multiple apps just set it up in the System preferences accessible by the apple menu top left (a bit like control panels on pc). I have it set to a mouse button so I can quickly switch between apps with a single click. The language icon in the top right of the finder can be useful esp if you allow the character pallete and keyboard layout menu items, these have been invaluable to me for finding the correct typographic symbol and inserting it into my text also certain keys used with option or option-shift allow special symbols like copyright and trademark plus accents etc.

I could go on but I think you get the idea - One thing I would say is always go for the best hardware setup you can and it will pay to have raid especially since HD's are so cheap just fill the internal bays up and use the disk utility to setup the raid block. Get the best drives you can though and make sure the jumpers are set correctly so that maximum throughput is achieved many people don't check the jumpers when they buy a new mac and they can be set at 1/2 the max transfer rate. I don't need to mention Time Machine - it knocks system restore into a cocked hat. Finally definitely install bootcamp and a version of windows 64Bit you can then max out the ram and use it for rendering massive scenes like I do, 16GB goes a long waaaaaayyyy....

Anyway have fun I'm sure you will.

CC Rider
09-27-2009, 09:28 AM
Thanks again for all the great insights!
I plan to keep my PC and use both platforms since I have a lot of PC software.
Waiting till I get my LLC setup and subsequent company bank account to keep all business purchases separate for taxes and such. Hopefully I'll have my new machine within a couple of weeks!

Do you feel like Mac's built-in software RAID solution will be good enough? or should I drop the extra$$$ for the hardware RAID card?
And what about external RAID drives...would a ESATA RAID solution be inviting trouble?
I won't be editing any feature quality res (2k, RED, or anything like that...)
just footage from XDCAM or P2 etc...

I don't want to skimp here and be sorry...but I also don't want to drop a lot of $$$ that I don't need to.

Slick Systems
09-28-2009, 02:29 AM
Personally I have had no experience of video editing on the mac however I would suggest that you'd only really need to splash the extra for a Card if the internal performance was no good. I had heard that software Raid solutions were a little flakey but have also heard many good things about Apples Raid Software so I would see no reason to swap to a card based solution just for that extra peace of mind (some might disagree).

External Raids can be pricey especially if you're looking at a high spec one with redundancy and hot swappable drives/power supplys etc etc. I would probably go for the internal solution and save the cash and see how it plays. If you were going down the external route you could look at a fibre channel solution which would give massive performance increases over standard connections and would require the fibre card in the mac and similar on the raid box. I believe this is still available.

Alternatively you could go for the card and get SAS drives instead which would provide added performance. I believe the SATA 6 standard is out from the quick search I did just before posting it promises 6GB transfer rate for SATA and a updated NCQ which should provide quite a kick. However having said that to take advantage of it I believe it would have to be an external solution as I'm sure the internal boards would not realize it's full potential.

In my limited opinion anything you opt for usually just works with a mac so I wouldn't worry too much about what you get to start with - it can always be upgraded very easily later.

revengeofmonty
10-07-2009, 06:44 AM
PC to Mac transition? Sounds like Ork mischief!

CC Rider
10-07-2009, 06:54 AM
:stumped:

I don't get it...

CC Rider
10-26-2009, 07:17 PM
Just got my new Mac Pro and basking in it's awesomeness...still waiting on the new monitor and some extra hdd's that I ordered separately to come in.
Haven't really taken out on the open road yet but so far I'm as impressed as I had hoped to be!
The only thing I have done to compare this machine to where I was, is to render the same scene on old and new machine.
Mac Pro finished a frame in 44 sec what took the old machine took 2 min.
"Old machine" being a quad core pc, 4GB ram, XP pro, bla bla bla.

Looking forward to opening this baby up when I get setup to do so!!
I'm printing all the swell advice from this thread for easy reference.

Didn't really make the switch because of LW...needed Final Cut Pro.

Thanks again
:D

jlyon
10-27-2009, 12:24 AM
I think it's mentioned in the latest 3d World, but get the Skitch (http://www.skitch.com/) app for screenshots. So much better than the native screen shot tool... plus it's free!

Slick Systems
10-27-2009, 03:48 AM
Glad you like it, I hope it serves you well for many years to come!!

Did you go for snow leopard in the end? if so would you mind seeing how stable LW is within it? I'm thinking of upgrading but I'm not sure if everything I have will be compatible and LW is one I can't afford to be flakey.

archijam
10-27-2009, 05:09 AM
slick: +1.

The installation disk is still burning a hole in my desk drawer ...

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 09:53 AM
The new machine did come with Snow Leopard. I've only done a few test renders so far, but noticed no problems whatsoever...very fast!
Hardly a "stability" report but, it beat the crap out of my PC in those few tests...

:D

Slick Systems
10-27-2009, 09:55 AM
Sounds good, I think I'll look into the upgrade again.

From memory the problems were display related but I'm not sure if these issues were fixed, what version of LW are you testing with?

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 09:58 AM
Everything I saw display related looked great...but again this was a simple test(s)

Running 9.6UB

Slick Systems
10-27-2009, 10:00 AM
Excellent, oooh i'm chomping at the bit now!!! :-)

What specification did you finally decide on if you don't mind me asking?

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 10:05 AM
Not at all...

Doesn't sound very glamourous but I just went with the base for just about everything.
6GB memory
2.26Mhz Dual Proc
1 HDD

I'll be adding upgrades myself...wound up being a good bit cheaper to add memory and Hard drives myself.
Still waiting for the monitor and a few HDD to come in to do real testing.
I thought I would start smaller and upgrade as necessary rather than spending $$ on performance I may not need.

But from what I've seen...even the most basic Dual Core Mac Pro packs quite a punch!!

Slick Systems
10-27-2009, 10:16 AM
Sounds good to me, I take it that it's one of the Nehalem processors (quad core) and not the octocore dual processor?

They look sweet spec wise on the apple store, I got my mac last year (october) so it's not the latest generation octocore but it is blisteringly fast at rendering when compared against my macbook pro laptop and my previous G5 tower.

In your very limited testing, how do you find the operating system when compared against the Microsoft offerings? - I'm not trying to start a debate here, I just wanted an honest opinion from someone who has recently entered the apple world.

Oh and while I'm thinking about it what extras did you get? you mentioned HDD's...
What flavour and spec...

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 10:33 AM
so far it's been a pretty easy transition.
I like OSX a lot!
I am MSCE, MCSA, MCE and A+ certified so Microsoft/PC ways are pretty firmly engrained into my head.
I was a little concerned about the transition just from a muscle memory standpoint but it really hasn't been an issue for me.

Granted, I'm still just getting my feet wet, but so far so good. Naturally, I wish I could move the command key over a couple of positions on the keyboard...CTRL C doesn't do squat in the Mac world...but I've pretty much gotten used to that too. Help is actually helpful in most cases, and Mac can do lots of things without much help from the user (like setting email accounts) that's actually kind of nice. Windows tends to bombard with questions or wizards which I have always hated, Mac doesn't come across that way.
I'll have a lot more to report when I get Final Cut Pro etc installed and start doing some real work.

As far as upgrades...not much there either until I start working and see where the "opportunities" are.
I have (3) 1TB Seagate drives coming that I'll RAID together into a Stripe set. Didn't get the RAID card, thought I would try the software RAID to see if it will work for now. I'm sure that will be an upgrade at some point down the road though
Here's the monitor I ordered (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=HP+%2F+Hewlett-Packard+LP2475W+24%22+WIDE+SCREEN+LCD+MONITOR&N=0&InitialSearch=yes)

May upgrade memory to 8 or 12 if necessary...again I'll wait to get into serious testing before I make that call as well.

It's been a lot of fun so far...awesome machine. Looking forward to the easy hardware upgrades via the wonderfully thought-out box layout.

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 10:40 AM
here are the hard drives as well... (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148433)


:D

avkills
10-27-2009, 04:02 PM
You'll like a 30" Cinema display a lot better for editing. But 1920x1200 is still a lot of pixels.

-mark

avkills
10-27-2009, 04:03 PM
You'll cry in delight on how easy the drives are to install.

-mark

CC Rider
10-27-2009, 07:24 PM
You'll like a 30" Cinema display a lot better for editing. But 1920x1200 is still a lot of pixels.

-mark

No doubt! I just couldn't afford it yet...maybe after a few good jobs though...

:D


You'll cry in delight on how easy the drives are to install.

Looking forward to that!!

Slick Systems
10-28-2009, 03:37 AM
I second opinions on the ease of hardware install - macs are very well thought out internally, drives are the easiest to install virtually on the level of a hardware raid with hot swappable drives that pull out, cards are also easily installed and memory too.

That 30"er would be a great addition and I'm sure you'd like it but as you say it's a stretch on a tight budget, I stuck with a smaller apple display and it works great especially with my pantone huey installed which keeps the monitor calibrated continuously (for a cheap device it works well).

Networking with the mac is also far simpler imo, usually just a plug and play scenario with minimal setting up. Wireless setup is a dream - again just plug and play most of the time, even more complex network tasks such as link aggregation (or port teaming on the PC) is a simple task. Additionally the settings are easily found in most cases, rather than hidden in some obscure advanced properties box inside other properties boxes etc etc... and usually they don't lie unlike a few wireless setups on the pc I've seen.

The HDD's do make sure when you get them that the jumpers are set to the correct speed setting, so as to achieve maximum throughput.

Overall I'm glad to hear your experience of OSX has been a happy one so far and it's nice to hear from a true pc-user source rather than some article on the net posted by mr anonymous. I think you'll find the mac community a good one and look forward to seeing some finished stuff off your new beast.

JonW
10-28-2009, 04:32 AM
I’ve got a 24” & 30” screen, mainly use the 24” with my Macs, The screens may not quite have the quality of the Mac, but you can easily adjust the height & swivel them, which is really useful on the 30”, which also has a stack of connections.

CC Rider
10-29-2009, 07:08 AM
Installed the new hard drives in the Mac Pro last night.
Booted the computer and it launched the disk/RAID utility for me.
Very intuitive.
Having never used it before, it took all of 2 minutes to configure the disks into an array and I was good to go. No manuals or help needed, and no condescending wizards to deal with either.

Beginning to see what all the fuss was about.
Very cool.

:D

The monitor (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=HP+%2F+Hewlett-Packard+LP2475W+24%22+WIDE+SCREEN+LCD+MONITOR&N=0&InitialSearch=yes) is awesome too!
If anyone is interested...great 24" monitor for unbeatable price.
I may have to get a 2nd one of those bad boys!
(at least as of day 1...hopefully I'll still feel this way a year from now...)

Slick Systems
10-29-2009, 07:59 AM
Glad to hear it, the fuss is certainly warranted imo.

Apple's disk utility is very easy to use and as you say quite intuitive. Even people with little to no experience of computers can use a utility like that and understand what they are doing. It also allows advanced users the speed and just plain hassle free setup of HDD's within their machines whilst providing a checking system and repair function when needed. Backups, RAID setup and partitioning are also easily achieved.

I'm sure it's not the most comprehensive utility out there and can probably be improved upon but for an operating system inclusive utility it works well.

Gui Lo
11-01-2009, 11:27 PM
The main day to day advantage I found is the use of Smart Folders, the Sidebar and Spotlight.

Try setting up some Smart Folders for .lwo and .lws files. Put them in the Sidebar and it saves lots of time. They will be there when Loading.

CC Rider
11-02-2009, 05:25 AM
Haven't heard of these yet...I'll check it out.
Thanks for the tip!

Gui Lo
11-03-2009, 08:25 PM
The easiest way is to simply do a search with Spotlight and then select 'Show All'.

In the search window you click 'File Name' to display, only say, .lwo files.

Then press 'Save'.

That's it. You now have access to all those files in that format from one place no matter to were they actually live.

I over looked the use of Screens. My suggestion is to start with a small number of screens, 4, and then add as needed.

Slick Systems
11-04-2009, 02:14 AM
Well guys I have to say spotlight is good but I've never found it that useful myself as I tend to keep a fairly structured filing system anyway so I usually know where stuff is without having to search to far.

The times I have used spotlight I have found that it seems to have limitations on where it will search for files. It may be my lack of knowledge but several times I have used spotlight to hunt for files I know are there but it just won't find them.

Having said that spotlight wins hands down over the windows equivalent which seems to take weeks to do a simple file find when asked.

The sidebar is handy and I use it frequently, the simplicity of it is also a boon. The other handy feature is the finder window toolbar which can have all sorts of quick links added just like the sidebar, I use it to store the calculator and a few utilities that I use often.

Smart folders is something I haven't used at all but I can see their appeal to some people especially when large numbers of files need to be sorted and accessed quickly.

There are many ways in which to utilise the OS to create a more efficient workflow and the customizability of OSX is a great feature in itself.

4 Screens! holy cow that many - I have to make do with just one!! :-) I wouldn't know what to fill all that space with!

Gui Lo
11-04-2009, 05:51 AM
Hi,
I don't use Spotlight often but it is quick for creating Smart Folders or for checking the meaning of a words.

I tend to use Smart Folders as an easy point of access rather than a substitute for organization. Good point. If the UI has tools that allow stuff to be a few clicks away then I use it.

I have Modeler on one screen and Layout on another. No definite advantage, it just seems to work better for me. I also keep Photoshop on a third screen.

Normally I have each large app on a different screen. The Mac comes with iLife, Safari, Mail and iTunes, and Lightwave has two. Once tried, I found them easy to setup and useful.

The use of the Toolbar is an excellent suggestion.