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aa1037
08-07-2009, 10:59 AM
Hi,

Any recommendations on how to best learn Lightwave?

I'd be very interested in how you personally did it and if you were to recommend a "curriculum" to a newbie (new to both 3D in general and Lightwave) what might that look like?

Thanks in advance.

Louis

shrox
08-07-2009, 11:34 AM
I started before there were schools, books and tutorials about 3d animation. Just start looking and clicking. You can't break it. Since the buttons are words rather than icons, it's easier to figure out what each does. And use the manual. It works.

cyatic
08-07-2009, 11:47 AM
I'd have to say I bought a bunch of books. The first one I used was the Lightwave Power User Guide. I think that's what it was called. Mainly from books and online tutorials though.

4dartist
08-07-2009, 12:45 PM
I mainly learned from the manual and Dan Alban books. Although prior training in Maya helped me with fundamental knowledge about 3d concepts that translate to any 3d app.

I'd say if are motivated enough, tutorials, books, the manual, and practice will do it.

dandeentremont
08-07-2009, 12:48 PM
I learned lightwave from the DAVE school which was an extremely enjoyable experience. I made some great connections there which helped land me my first job in CG. I also think these (http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77002) free tutorial videos are extremely helpful if you plan on teaching yourself.

mac
08-07-2009, 12:48 PM
There are a plethora of online tutorials (mostly free) that are available to everyone.

shrox
08-07-2009, 12:57 PM
Yes, I second what everyone else said about tutorials, and "Essential Lightwave" from Wordware is a great book and the content CD is as well.

SplineGod
08-07-2009, 02:01 PM
I also started when there was no books, videos etc. I would pick projects and hammer away. What books etc that I would end up getting were on real world lighting etc then I would try and reproduce that in 3d.

aa1037
08-07-2009, 02:16 PM
Thanks everybody! I appreciate your input - really helps.

Keadil
08-10-2009, 07:36 PM
I also started when there was no books, videos etc. I would pick projects and hammer away. What books etc that I would end up getting were on real world lighting etc then I would try and reproduce that in 3d.

You're teaching me most of what I know about LW, Larry. :D The Kurv Studios videos are excellent btw. I'm still a newb at this since the interface is so different from my usual programs. I also have the current Inside Lightwave book, which helps some.

:lwicon:

G-Man
08-10-2009, 08:40 PM
I learned by having to do a projects that had hard deadlines. That forces you to learn the tool quickly. I also thought the videos from Ron Thornton were very helpful back in the day. Make yourself do a project, even if it's small. Try some of the CG challenges and make yourself finish by the deadline, even if it doesn't look that good at first.

JamesCurtis
08-10-2009, 09:30 PM
Gotta say that I've been using LW since 1991 [Amiga Video Toaster] and the first few days I used it then, I had a little trouble figuring how to do things [almost had buyers remorse back then], but then suddenly it all clicked and learning how to use it became very intuitive.

It may take awhile, but it's well worth the effort. BTW, I've tried other packages and it's been tough trying to get into them - not nearly as friendly.

GandB
08-10-2009, 09:37 PM
Dan Ablan's series all the way for me; also have an extensive Kurv Video collection.

shrox
08-10-2009, 10:17 PM
I got a DEC/Alpha on loan from Amblin Studios. That was 1994? or so, sometimes I think just figuring it out is the best way, but I can certainly see the advantage of a school with excellent teachers.

SplineGod
08-10-2009, 11:24 PM
You're teaching me most of what I know about LW, Larry. :D The Kurv Studios videos are excellent btw. I'm still a newb at this since the interface is so different from my usual programs. I also have the current Inside Lightwave book, which helps some.

:lwicon:

Thanks, I appreciate the comments and am glad the DVDs have been helpful :)

cresshead
08-10-2009, 11:44 PM
i learned lightwave via a couple of books and some brad peebler/dan ablan vids when i started out, then bought a few splinegod vids later on. I was also learning 3dsmax at about the same time so many '3d' training vids cross over from say max to lw or lw to max.

i never got on with the lightwave manuals...too dry..they should ship with a bottle of wine to loosen them up!

i've bought quite a few training vids over the years for lw,max,zbrush,maya,vue and to be honest many trainers shouldn't...

there's some very talented artists out there but that doesn't mean they can 'teach' squat.

of my top of the list i'd say...

splinegod is rather good, i like his approach to teaching he hits record and just let's it go
so it's fresh and doesn't feel scripted.
proton's vids are excellent for short 'how too's' videos he's made.

digital tutors zbrush3/maya/max modeling trainer, he's very good though not all the DT trainers are.
3dbuzz are excellent Zak does a great job but they do tend to go off tangent...but that's okay as they are entertaining.

jeff lew's training was entertaining [general character animating]
meats mier is good [zbrush]

okay i'm going off topic but you get the idea..

shrox
08-11-2009, 12:40 AM
...there's some very talented artists out there but that doesn't mean they can 'teach' squat...

Oh, that would be me...

akademus
08-11-2009, 01:20 AM
Started off in 1997, a friend of mine showed lw to me. It was too heavy for evveryone I knew to handle its wicked interface. I spent a good year just figuring on my own, then I bought some books, Ablans Inside LW was the first one, LW applied, LW3D book and so on.

happy days...

3DGFXStudios
08-11-2009, 03:19 AM
I learned lw without any books dvd's etc, only tutorials. I started using lw on the amiga but back then I was 10 years old so my English was not that great :D. So the first few years was trial and error for me. Later on when the internet showed up I found tutorials.

nikfaulkner
08-11-2009, 08:24 AM
totally self taught on an amiga 4000 at college, no manuals (i later leant it was a dodgy copy) or internet back then to help.

i set myself little projects and worked it out. i still prefer learning this way rather than following tutorials. i still watch them, just taking the relevent info from them.

n.

Matt
08-11-2009, 01:09 PM
Taught myself the basics before I had internet access, so no nice video tutorials / community help for me initially. I was also (still am) the only LightWave user I know in these parts, so ever had anyone to bounce ideas off / learn from either.

It was only until I finally got access to the forums that I started _really_ learning how to use LightWave, seriously, there are some fundamental workflows in LightWave that when you learn them, suddenly it feels like a brand new package with the shackles taken off! It made the world of difference to me.

There are still many areas I don't really use, character animation being one, followed closely by effect stuff, although I have played around with that side, so I do know how to use it, just not to any great level.

Best way of learning I find (with anything actually) is to actually do a mini-project in it. Start simple, something that introduces new concepts, but is not unattainable. Then move onto new areas / more challenging subjects.

Try and touch on all apsects of LightWave during your 'training' phase, it will give you a good idea of how everything works together.

And ask away on the forums, I've learnt so much on here, more than any manual could ever have done, but do read that, it gives you a sense of 'what's possible' in LightWave.

massmusic
08-11-2009, 01:22 PM
Started learning in '93 and am still learning LW to this day

hrgiger
08-11-2009, 05:39 PM
Bought Inside Lightwave 6 by Dan Ablan plus had some desktop image videos that Dan had done as well. Started with the infamous head modeling tutorial by Stuart Aitken that Dan included in ILW6 and was so popular, he featured it again in ILW7.

Lightwolf
08-11-2009, 05:53 PM
Self taught, also before the internet sprang alive (even though I did have e-mail access, and even found the LW mailing list quite quickly).

I read the manual (and still do read the manual for every piece of software I buy) and then dove right into the first (simple) projects. I did have a bit of previous 3D experience though (mainly with the now dead Imagine 3D).

Even if the manual is dry, it helps to skim over it once or twice to get a general idea of what there is... and where to find it. You won't memorize it, but you'll remember parts of it.

Cheers,
Mike

wacom
08-12-2009, 01:18 PM
Read the manual cover to cover. Read I think "Inside LW 7" and did many of the tutorials in it. Kept up on the forums for a while.

I find just reading threads other peoples problems in the forums very informative esp. on subjects I have no idea about. If an solution or two come up, then I try and run through them to see how they work. If no solution comes up, and I think the issue could affect me directly I try and find a way around it myself.

That seems to help prevent snafus and such from happening as much, and it's kind of like reading the manual in that way when you have an issue, as you're at least not completely in the dark and will know what key words to search for when looking up a solution or two.

While I too learned a lot about programs pre-internet, I'd have to say I'm totally NOT for banging your head against a wall if you can help it. "Click and Learn" is so 80's! Get good training by asking around and stating your experience level. Keep in mind though that bad training is out there, and a lot of people can act like authorities on subjects and mislead people as to the real solution(s). Like me! :)

All you have to do is look up how many people purport to know the correct way to use AO in a pass and you'll see what you're up against!

BTW- real information on rendering and lighting is worth it's wait in gold. I think for modeling and lighting looking at the bigger picture of how things work in MOST programs will go a long way.

Check out this book for really good basics on direct lighting (which is horribly mis understood and under used IMHO when it comes to NT users and the non-deadline oriented, post GI CG crowd in general).

http://www.3drender.com/light/index.html

If you're looking into animation, then be sure to read something more traditional before stumbling along with 3D tools- "Animator's Survival Kit" comes highly recommended. No matter how good you are at tweaking fcurves or rigging, if you don't know the basics of "good" animation you're going to be flying blind and making that all too familiar "CG" style of Robotic animation with no sense of timing.

When it comes to modeling, be sure to check out at least two ways to do something as you'll most likely benefit from as many little tips and tricks on that front as you can get.

shrox
08-12-2009, 01:38 PM
I was using 3D Studio (before it became Max) and I liked it allot. Then I was given Max to beta test and I hated it. Right about then I got the DEC/Alpha from Amblin with Lightwave 4 I think, whatever they were doing Seaquest and Voyager with. I found it really easy to learn, and with in a week I had some decent stuff going. I just hope that going from Lightwave to CORE won't mirror my experience with 3D Studio/Max.

Titus
08-12-2009, 01:43 PM
Started in 97, a friend had an animation studio back then. Self-thought, Dan Ablan books, and am still learning.

bjornkn
08-12-2009, 02:06 PM
I started using Cyber Studio on Atari in 86, which I loved at the time. Went on wih 3D Studio, which I hated. In 92(?) I evaluated LW, Imagine, Real 3D and trueSpace. I hated all of them except truespace, which was my first choice for many years, Then i got LW 6(?) as a partial payment for a job. I also bought Cinema XL at the same time, but got so fed up by the Maxon people and their Swedish agents that I threw it away (cost $2000!). Never liked it very much, and the prices they charged for it was insane even then (and even worse now).
Started using LW instead, and upgrading, reading a lot of books, Inside LW6, 7 etc, as well as other books, like 1001 tips etc. Watched a lot of tutorials too, but most of the time was spent using it and experimenting, which is the only way to really learn a program. I still don't really like it very much, I'm afraid, but it renders beautifully and fast, and it's the best choice at the moment for my usage, which is mostly architectural. It is also quite important to me that it is not a part of the AD pool.
I still do most of my modelling in SketchUp, which is a joy to use :)
The old LW GUI is a messy, unstable nightmare compared to the simple, but still very powerful SU GUI and toolset.

*Pete*
08-12-2009, 02:12 PM
how did you learn lightwave??....i didnt :(


truth to be told...selftaught, but since i am a bad teacher and a lousy student im constantly lagging behind, i see so clearly what i want to create but i never get close enough to be satisfied...but its fun to try ;)

halley
08-12-2009, 02:20 PM
You're teaching me most of what I know about LW, Larry. :D The Kurv Studios videos are excellent btw. I'm still a newb at this since the interface is so different from my usual programs. I also have the current Inside Lightwave book, which helps some.

:lwicon:
I started at a local community collage wear Larry used to teach. Unfortunately for me I started the year he left and never had him as an instructor. I can tell you this… the students he had actually learned some thing and had great skill. That was not the norm at this school. I was lucky to have some of them share what they learned from Larry. It helped mostly spline modeling. I ended up learning by book, online tutorial, small projects, and the video and web broadcast by Kurv studios. I also was lucky to have a film and video background which was very helpful. And don’t just learn Lightwave learn Photoshop and Aftereffects or some other compositing program.

I almost forgot I have learned a lot just by surfing this forum, and reading all the good advice given, and all the information shared.

Ratboy
08-12-2009, 03:49 PM
I just beat my head against it back around version 5 or so until I understood it. The manuals helped, and occasionally I got some tips from another guy at work, but for the most part I'm self taught.

Lightwolf
08-12-2009, 04:40 PM
...and am still learning.
Once that stops you might as well start shopping for a grave ;)
Then again, that's what I like about this field... there's always something new to learn.

Cheers,
Mike

SplineGod
08-12-2009, 06:23 PM
Keadil, Hailey, Thanks! :)
I remember starting out using videoscape 3d on the amiga and having to model by drawing on graph paper and manually typing in the coords to create a 3d model. No opengl either. :)
I had a lot of fun teaching there with Brad Carvey.

wacom
08-12-2009, 06:27 PM
Once that stops you might as well start shopping for a grave ;)
Then again, that's what I like about this field... there's always something new to learn.

Cheers,
Mike

I was discussing this topic in a broad sense with my wife and a friend the other night. Certain types of people just love to learn each and every day- and look forward to changes in that sense. We all agreed that finding, having and maintaining such positions was critical to our mental well being.

Luckily not everyone likes to learn all the time! Small tick box some can add for job extra job security if you do eh?

Magnus81
08-12-2009, 07:04 PM
As for myself, saw a video of Bryce from the now long gone Metacreations. Bought it three days after my 17th bday. That got me started in 3d. Then stumbled upon LW a few years later over the net. Been hooked for over ten years now, and all ten of those years were self taught. (Not much learning resources here in the backwoods of Idaho.) Kinda funny though, before I got into 3d, I decided I was going to be a studio drummer. But once I got a taste of the CG realm, there was no going back.

shrox
08-12-2009, 07:22 PM
I was discussing this topic in a broad sense with my wife and a friend the other night. Certain types of people just love to learn each and every day- and look forward to changes in that sense. We all agreed that finding, having and maintaining such positions was critical to our mental well being....

I think that I am kind of scared about learning CORE. Is it radically different than LW 9.6?

Magnus81
08-12-2009, 07:42 PM
I think that I am kind of scared about learning CORE. Is it radically different than LW 9.6?
Just do like the rest of us, and strap on some diapers when Core is released!!:hey:

SplineGod
08-12-2009, 07:48 PM
I think that I am kind of scared about learning CORE. Is it radically different than LW 9.6?

Yes but its not the learning of a new app that bothers me. Its investing the time into something thats a huge crap shoot because Core will have essentially no market share and a long period before its stable and useable in production especially when there are other apps that already have quite a track record.

Magnus81
08-12-2009, 07:53 PM
Thinking about moving on, Larry? I feel a little uneasy about using an app that will undoubtedly take years to fully get off the ground, let alone be production stable. The other option is to stay with 9.6, but considering how long it could take CORE to mature, we're left with an unupdated (is that a word?) LW 9.6 for who knows how long.

SplineGod
08-12-2009, 08:00 PM
Unfortunately more then just thinking about it. Ill still use LW for as long as I can for freelance work etc but LW as we know it is at a developmental end. Give NTs past record of releasing things before its ready, waiting months for stable, production ready versions...I just dont feel comfy with all my eggs in one basket. Plus to stay marketable you have to use with the markets using.

Magnus81
08-12-2009, 08:02 PM
Sad times.....

SplineGod
08-12-2009, 08:08 PM
Well not really. Luckily software generally isnt like an endangered species of animal when once its gone its gone. Software can bounce back. If Core turns out to be a good app then theres no reason not to use it. I paid for the HC membership because it never hurts t o hedge ones bets. :)
If it succeeds, great, if not, well theres lots of other apps out there to use. :)

shrox
08-12-2009, 08:14 PM
Well not really. Luckily software generally isnt like an endangered species of animal when once its gone its gone. Software can bounce back. If Core turns out to be a good app then theres no reason not to use it. I paid for the HC membership because it never hurts t o hedge ones bets. :)
If it succeeds, great, if not, well theres lots of other apps out there to use. :)

Yes, it's not like darkrooms, stat cameras and rub down type.

thomascheng
08-12-2009, 08:35 PM
I learned by going thru 2 Lightwave books cover to cover, then DAVE School. If you want to learn the essentials quickly, I would recommend DAVE School. They will kick your arse and give you impossible deadlines and you will love them for it. However, it is probably the most expensive option. If you don't have the money and not willing to live in Orlando for a year, there are plenty of online training available that will get you up to speed too.

wacom
08-12-2009, 11:35 PM
I think that I am kind of scared about learning CORE. Is it radically different than LW 9.6?

Well...if the dooms day theory holds true it will just be like "all those other applications not LW". So even if that's true is it not a win?

If it's like say Houdini in a sense...then wouldn't that make it easier to learn Houdini if you needed too? I see no problem with LW gaining some "proven standards" while at the same time making some of them their own.

It isn't like NT invented lambert shading or "THE POLYGON".

I'm wishing on a NT star for core, because if they don't deliver I'm going to have to keep feeding the AD beast my money for XSI unless some currently unknown application comes out that is insane and priced right. For me though it's a simple equation.

If core some how "sucks" and XSI goes the way of the dodo and there is nothing new on the market, then I'll have to sign my life away to Houdini. Sad but true.

Besides- if you want the old NT 7.x way of things, with new glossy buttons there is always C4D with all it's canned this and that and a dash of spice. If you don't animate much, hate render trees, then you could save even more money and go with Modo.

Me, I have a monkey to feed...too bad for me...my maintenance costs are about the same as a new Modo license...

jin choung
08-13-2009, 02:08 AM
read dan ablan's Inside LW for version 5 as well as his lightwave powerguide cover to cover in bed. and the manuals for lw 5.5, cover to cover. in bed. didn't even own a computer capable of running lw 1.0 at the time (leading edge model D - ibm pc xt compatible with two floppy drives [that's 5 1/4" to you youngsters]).

when i got back to work, i discovered that i kinda knew how to do stuff....

true story.

a good bed is absolutely essential.

jin

jaxtone
08-13-2009, 03:11 AM
Damn, I am old but I still remember some blurred out memories from a detour through big industrial computers on a car enginge CAD department in the end of the 80īs and even a small Amiga 500 that made me cry in the same decade. Jumped on a train were TDIīs Explore were involved, slow and expensice but up till then the only competative solution:

"In a bold move that would move Wavefront acquired Thomson Digital Images of France (founded in 1984) in 1993. TDI had innovated in the area of NURBS modeling and interactive rendering and had extensive distribution channels in Europe and Asia. Originally a partner with IBM, TDI also established a commercial production arm, which would later merge with Sogitec to become Ex Machina. TDI's main software product was TDI Explore, a tool suite that included 3Design for modeling, Anim for animation, and Interactive Photorealistic Renderer (IPR) for rendering. (Note: Alias Maya is the result of the merger of the three packages: Wavefront's Advanced Visualizer, Alias's Power Animator, and TDI's Explore.)"

I found out that my finances ever would bring me one of these mega expensive systems so I switched over to music production for a couple of years and used my airbrush gun for some minor jobs.

Suddenly a fellow asked me if I wanted to help him out with a piece of artwork for a commercial campaign. He had this MAC and something called Strata 3D and I was on it again.

6 months later I invested in my first PC dedicated for graphic art and 3D... went to some MAYA courses in London but Lightwave came in by a co-incidence. I went to try LW at a friends house and since the interface looked pretty much like the industrial CAD systems I worked with earlier Lightwave felt more familiar than 3D-Studio and other applications.

I must add that this forum probably is among the best since there are so many skilled, friendly and open minded users that are willing to help when or if they can!

waly
08-13-2009, 03:57 AM
I strongly recommend Dan Ablan's video tutorials, it s a great start.
After you get the basics, the more advanced stuff will be covered from the folks on the forums especially here. Myself i got almost all the answers there, and i would like to use this opportunity to thank one again to everybody who was able to help.

Tom Wood
08-13-2009, 07:32 AM
Since I had a fairly clear goal of what I wanted to see when it was finished, I focused on just the relatively few tools that would get me there. Along the way I learned more things, mostly from reading this forum. Keep in mind that the manual may not be organized in terms of a workflow, so reading it front to back doesn't take you through a logical series of steps.

OnlineRender
08-13-2009, 07:33 AM
read , read then read more .............. then sit for 10 years infront of a computer ,without ever moving "ever" .... :P

jaxtone
08-13-2009, 02:49 PM
... shame on me, I hate reading!


read , read then read more .............. then sit for 10 years infront of a computer ,without ever moving "ever" .... :P

shrox
08-13-2009, 02:56 PM
... shame on me, I hate reading!

Yes, but it's "light" reading...

Magnus81
08-13-2009, 04:43 PM
I agree with Jin. Inside LW is awesome reading. I got Inside LW 6 years ago, and learned so much from the female head tutorial. Good stuff.

SplineGod
08-13-2009, 05:06 PM
Ive always preferred to watch someone do something or via video to learn something like 3d and use the books for reference. Watching someone setup and explain IK, texturing etc is a lot faster then spending a week reading about it. :)

Mr Rid
08-13-2009, 05:44 PM
Wow, I cant believe no one has suggested (or did I miss it) the wealth of William Vaughan's free tutorials all over the place. You dont need to spend a dime. Its the equivalent of how I learned mostly thru the wonderful 'Best of Lightwave Pro' tuts compilation in '96.

Magnus81
08-13-2009, 05:52 PM
We should all be ashamed of ourselves. How could we forget about the Proton? I learned a lot from him too.

jameswillmott
08-13-2009, 05:54 PM
I started before there were schools, books and tutorials about 3d animation. Just start looking and clicking. You can't break it. Since the buttons are words rather than icons, it's easier to figure out what each does. And use the manual. It works.

Quoted for wisdom, also, use the community, they are usually very helpful.

Waves of light
08-15-2009, 02:58 PM
For me it was LWG3D (now Foundation3d), Dan's books from Inside v7 onwards, Larry's DVDs, Spinquad site and lots of online tuts.

However, I always try to go back to the manual (PDF or hard copy) and go through it again and again, trying to remember what each function does/achieves. I still do it now, so that when I come to a project I look at it and think "what could i use to make that', 'what's going to be the quickest'.

jin choung
08-15-2009, 03:06 PM
barring illiteracy or some kind of learning disability - and personally speaking - i dislike videos precisely because it's slower than my ability to read and flip pages.

but to each his own.

jin

jasonwestmas
08-15-2009, 03:12 PM
Lots of books, time and videos. All preceded with a lot of preparation and meditation for getting the project done and according to vision. The more prep you do the faster and better the project will be.

Waves of light
08-15-2009, 03:22 PM
The more prep you do the faster and better the project will be.

I never got that in the beginning, I always wanted to get to the end, the 'I can do that' feeling. But know.... prep prep and prep some more.

aa1037
08-15-2009, 04:38 PM
Sorry if I'm missing the obvious - but what do you mean by preparation?

Thanks.

jasonwestmas
08-15-2009, 05:01 PM
Preparation can include many things.

The basics are:

- Basic Back Story and a primary reason for what you are doing

- Script writing for all dialogue, scene design and sequencing

- Story Board for setting up your shots and showing basic key frames

- Concept Drawings for modeling and surfacing

- Video Reference or motion capture for animation

- Tool/ Plugin/ Pipeline Planning with necessary Hardware

dbigers
08-15-2009, 09:20 PM
Another great source of information is Larry's World Tour CD's. It doesnt cover all the latest bells and whistles because they are older, but they will get you up and running in no time.

:thumbsup:

simonlion
08-16-2009, 03:36 AM
I toke courses In U.C.L.A, But to be Honest with you, I learned so much from Dan Ablan Tutorials... I think the best way to learn Lightwave Is to Download, and Buy all the Tutorials from the web,, and once you Download the Trutoial, practice It at least 5 times, so you dont forget..
Good Luck
Simon...

jaxtone
08-16-2009, 04:44 AM
To some letters, theories and page flipping is an art. To others itīs just painful.

Imī not talking about the latest 10 000 years now but I guess that the art of reading is a quite new skill for the human races life history on this planet. I guess that the majority of common people in most western countries common didnīt have access to the written word before a couple of hundred years ago back in time.

So how did people learn before that? By using all senses and the old "trial and error" method. The learning tutorials with sound and video is probably the best alternative for the practical learning methods that mankind in common still prefer. (But of course without the smell factor.) :hey:

In a modern society were "information technology" is the buzz word I just say, "Lucky you"... that have both patience, gift and are priviligied enough to prefer theoretical learning prior practical learning.


barring illiteracy or some kind of learning disability - and personally speaking - i dislike videos precisely because it's slower than my ability to read and flip pages.

but to each his own.

jin

Magnus81
08-16-2009, 07:02 PM
Preparation can include many things.

The basics are:

- Basic Back Story and a primary reason for what you are doing

- Script writing for all dialogue, scene design and sequencing

- Story Board for setting up your shots and showing basic key frames

- Concept Drawings for modeling and surfacing

- Video Reference or motion capture for animation

- Tool/ Plugin/ Pipeline Planning with necessary Hardware
You for got to add in slamming down a few dozen Mt. Dews!!:D

plankton
08-18-2009, 04:55 AM
Just wondering if there is going to be a '1000' tips book for the lightwave 9 series.. i believe there was one of these for version 8...

Panikos
08-18-2009, 07:39 AM
I learn driving by driving

jasonwestmas
08-18-2009, 07:41 AM
I learn driving by driving

I like to save gas with a map.;D

simonlion
08-20-2009, 01:49 AM
I strongly recommend Dan Ablan's video tutorials, it s a great start.
After you get the basics, the more advanced stuff will be covered from the folks on the forums especially here. Myself i got almost all the answers there, and i would like to use this opportunity to thank one again to everybody who was able to help.

I agree with you 100%, I learned so much, from Dan Ablans Tutorials.
he Is great, and If you have any problems he will email you...
you will learn A-Lot from his tutorials.....
Simon....

simonlion
08-23-2009, 02:38 AM
I agree with you that Is how I learned... From Dan Ablan..
Simon

mav3rick
08-23-2009, 01:59 PM
back in days when i was kid 13yo i came to friend and saw lightwave 3.0 .. i was impressed... from then all was about trial and errors.. press here press there... than i found dan ablan books started read... and that's it....

akademus
08-23-2009, 02:57 PM
I finally found these pics.

This is what honorably holds my monitor at home, my first LW book and the latter Inside LW6 from Dan.

The other two are also awesome, especially Applied from where I learned probably the greatest deal about LW.

As a matter of fact, I have two Applied books, one of them has never been unpacked :)

If anyone is interested... :D

jin choung
08-23-2009, 03:00 PM
yeah, that lw 3d book is fing rockin'... i read that several times over while learning cg....

jin

OnlineRender
08-23-2009, 03:12 PM
barring illiteracy or some kind of learning disability - and personally speaking - i dislike videos precisely because it's slower than my ability to read and flip pages.

but to each his own.

jin

ye but ,Jin your a machine !

edit add smiley face to increase humor (",)

jin choung
08-23-2009, 03:17 PM
ye but ,Jin your a machine !

who told? i mean...

LIARS! all LIARS! i am and have always been 100% human composed mostly of water, despicable soft tissue and a laughably fragile endoskeletal infrastructure.

[pending.... SUBROUTINE 'EXTERMINATION OF ALL MANKIND'... resume]

EOL... i mean... sincerely,

jin

Cabugi
08-24-2009, 08:08 AM
I took an intro to 3D summer class got hooked. Got into the school that had the class and found out they canned the 3D program so I ended up teaching myself with books and the internet.

revengeofmonty
08-24-2009, 08:14 AM
I stumbled around in the dark, tripping over furniture, pulling levers, flicking lightswitches here and there, stood on the cat a few times, banged my shins on that bloody coffee table and bumped my forehead on that low cupboard whose door doesn't open properly. Then I walked straight into a wall.

I got Dan Alban's Inside Lightwave 7, then just tutorials online from here, spinquad, foundation 3d, 'lightwave tutorials on the web', 3dmag, and oh my god how many other websites. There are literally hundreds of LW users on here and other sites whose work I have admired, scrutinized, read and picked apart to attempt to pick up techniques and hints.

I got into 3d back on my Amiga 500...using Imagine.

I can't actually remember how I came across Lightwave....probably through it's association with the Amiga, after the fact, once I got a PC.

akademus
08-24-2009, 08:23 AM
'lightwave tutorials on the web'

I must have typed that phrase into search engines more than 1000 times.

I literally went through every single tutorial on that beautiful site!

mosconariz
08-24-2009, 11:12 PM
I started before there were schools, books and tutorials about 3d animation. Just start looking and clicking. You can't break it. Since the buttons are words rather than icons, it's easier to figure out what each does. And use the manual. It works.

I started the same way, and whithout the manual! It was LW 5.0, so a little things have changed since then. The program is like 3 times bigger, hehe

Teruchan
08-25-2009, 04:39 AM
Believe it or not I started with Videoscape 3D on the Amiga back in the olden days. I created my first models on graph paper and typed them in, coordinate by coordinate. Even writing that now it sounds like a joke, but it is true.

When Lightwave came around it was still pretty similar in the interface, so I flowed right into it. I kept growing with the program so I never had the experience of someone who may have signed on at version 6 or 8, with hundreds of new tools. Each new version gave me a few new things to learn and I kept up... until recently I guess. hehehe

probiner
08-25-2009, 05:03 AM
I started with Videoscape 3D on the Amiga back in the olden days. I created my first models on graph paper and typed them in, coordinate by coordinate.

So... VideoScape was to modeling, as http://www.xtranormal.com/ is to animation: If you can type, you can do it :D

Glad to be modeling in these days...

bkmvlswe
08-26-2009, 06:01 AM
Been reading inside lightwave 9 rather good book, and i picked up some video courses including the casino one.
I bought my lw9 box with printed manuals but haven't used them much, bit on the dry side i guess :)

I just fail to stay on one thing until it sticks, so i sure need to spend more time with the application

OnlineRender
08-26-2009, 07:59 AM
So... VideoScape was to modeling, as http://www.xtranormal.com/ is to animation: If you can type, you can do it :D

Glad to be modeling in these days...

you really like that site lol

essential LW is an excellent read , im sure if you google theres a pdf version kicking about , either that it was the essential lighting guide " great read "