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Thread: Cubic Texture Direction - x, y, z independant

  1. #1
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    Cubic Texture Direction - x, y, z independant

    I can think of a complicated method of what I am trying to achieve but there must be an easy of doing this.

    As an example - I have a cube I would like to texture. I load a vertically grained wood texture and the x and z sides of the cube are all vertical as needed (ignore the y axis for the moment). I would like to use the same vertical texture, cubically applied (rotated 90• horizontal direction) to the x and z axis without going back to Photoshop and rotating the textures. I can get x working properly, or y working properly but not both at the same time. It would be nice to have directional flexibility on the y axis as well but this is secondary.

    I would rather not use UV maps or multiple surface designations on the same cube object.
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  2. #2
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    And a cubic texture map isn't enough? Otherwise, I would say a UV map was your best bet. Simply create a planar map for each side using the same map name so that the squares simply get overlaid. If you unweld before making the map you can rotate each individual side in the UV map to be the rotation you want. I attach an example.

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeVee View Post
    And a cubic texture map isn't enough? Otherwise, I would say a UV map was your best bet. Simply create a planar map for each side using the same map name so that the squares simply get overlaid. If you unweld before making the map you can rotate each individual side in the UV map to be the rotation you want. I attach an example.

    B

    Thanks for replay.

    I do a lot of complex furniture and casework and am hoping for a material I can through at all of it without going in and designating the plane of each. I guess I'll keep up my old habit of creating vertical and horizontal images as needed.

  4. #4
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    You could use a gradient as an alpha mask with distance to x or z in the input. To blend the two cubic projections.

    You could do something more complicqted based off of the normal direction with nodes too.

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