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  1. #1
    Member
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    Mar 2003
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    California
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    3D Stereoscopic workflow suggestions

    Hi, do you have any suggestions on editing and viewing 3D Stereoscopic material? Currently we are rendering 3D Stereoscopic out of Lightwave for animation. Also have a Fuji 3D photo camera for still images. Planning to purchase a 3D Stereoscopic camcorder in the near future. Also looking at the Matrox MXO2 LE for 3D HDMI output to a 3D HDTV using active shutter 3D glasses.

    After rendering in Lightwave or capturing footage from the 3D camera, how can we edit 3D Stereoscopic footage and view it while editing? Is there any way that SpeedEDIT 2 deals with 3D Stereoscopic footage? Is the 3D Stereoscopic clip just another AVI file with the LEFT eye RIGHT eye embedded in the file?

    Our workflow is Lightwave 3D > After Effects > SpeedEDIT 2 but we are willing to use other NLE if needed.

    Any 3D Stereoscopic workflow suggestions would be appreciated...

  2. #2
    Rock'nRoll Set Visualiser Adrian@Stufish's Avatar
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    Apr 2003
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    London, UK
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    Talking

    Don't think Speed-edit will display 3D for a while, doesn't stop you using it.
    1) there is no 'absolute' 3D format - different display systems display in different ways and most can read a variety of formats.
    2) most common is to have a double size format - the 2 images with one above the other or side by side - We use left over right because SpeedEdit can handle 1280x1440 image but not 1560x720 !
    3) I render in LW to give me two image sequences as source (L & R) then convert those into two 1280x720 speedHQ avi files, then when I've got all my source material ready make a 1280x1440 project & put one pair at a time left over right & render to a new 'Under&Over' avi.
    At that point you can check them for 3D quality with whatever viewing system - we use NVIDIA 3D Vision - which needs an inappropriate monitor with an NVDIA approved sticker on it and an appropriate video card and emitter & glasses
    -we've just got some BenQ XL2410T 24 inch monitors which are pretty good.
    Then just edit up !

    There are some interlaced 3D formats - but very few ways of watching them
    The BluRay 3D format requires much voodoo - the encoding software looks like $3,000 +
    It works by encoding the left hand image stream as full quality HD video and then appends the 'difference' between the right and left - which I gather is only 15-20% of the data requirement of the full image.
    It's only Rock & Roll, but it pays the wages!

  3. #3
    Rock'nRoll Set Visualiser Adrian@Stufish's Avatar
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    Wink

    PS
    a quicker way to combine under/over is
    (Heath Robinson Rules OK)
    a standard LW scene & object with 2 placards (each 12.8x7.2) one above the other.
    Axonometric camera set to size 12.8 x 14.4
    Open the scene,
    map one image stream to each placard
    re-render to over/under.
    Sounds incredibly naff I know, but I can't find a fault in it !
    It's only Rock & Roll, but it pays the wages!

  4. #4
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    Apr 2012
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    Burbank, California
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    3D Stereoscopic editing

    Quote Originally Posted by LAD3D View Post
    Hi, do you have any suggestions on editing and viewing 3D Stereoscopic material? Currently we are rendering 3D Stereoscopic out of Lightwave for animation. Also have a Fuji 3D photo camera for still images. Planning to purchase a 3D Stereoscopic camcorder in the near future. Also looking at the Matrox MXO2 LE for 3D HDMI output to a 3D HDTV using active shutter 3D glasses.

    After rendering in Lightwave or capturing footage from the 3D camera, how can we edit 3D Stereoscopic footage and view it while editing? Is there any way that SpeedEDIT 2 deals with 3D Stereoscopic footage? Is the 3D Stereoscopic clip just another AVI file with the LEFT eye RIGHT eye embedded in the file?

    Our workflow is Lightwave 3D > After Effects > SpeedEDIT 2 but we are willing to use other NLE if needed.

    Any 3D Stereoscopic workflow suggestions would be appreciated...
    Perhaps the one most important aspect of 3D Stereoscopic editing is that it be edited and viewed stereoscopically while editing. Several editors new to this have edited one eye view and then conformed the other eye view to the EDL. Then they discovered that they had to re-edit again to match transitions. By viewing the images stereoscopically, a lot of time and dollars may be saved by doing this simultaneously.

    Basically, it amounts to matching transitions. In most cases, it is simply a global lateral shift of each eye-view to match each scene to the one preceding and following. By matching, this involves checking the near point and the far point, and visually averaging the positions such that the eyes do not have to instantly reconverge at the transitions. As with editing in general, this comes with practice and experience.

    Sometimes, especially if parallaxes change within a particular shot, it is also necessary to "ramp" the global shift at the beginning and/or end of the shot(s) to make this smooth. The general rule here is to ramp 50 percent on the outgoing shot and 50 percent on an incoming shot, similar to a dissolve, but in this case it applies to all transitions whether dissolves, fades, wipes, or even crash cuts.

    Sometimes the lateral shifts necessary to effect these smooth stereoscopic transitions result in left and/or right frame edge violations. When this happens, the editing correction is usually a dynamic floating window.

    Many other considerations may occur with specific shots and scenes that affect the stereoscopic impression. But, these are the main ones for the editor beginning in this fascinating challanging but intriguing skill acquisition.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR+ View Post
    Perhaps the one most important aspect of 3D Stereoscopic editing is that it be edited and viewed stereoscopically while editing. Several editors new to this have edited one eye view and then conformed the other eye view to the EDL. Then they discovered that they had to re-edit again to match transitions. By viewing the images stereoscopically, a lot of time and dollars may be saved by doing this simultaneously.

    Basically, it amounts to matching transitions. In most cases, it is simply a global lateral shift of each eye-view to match each scene to the one preceding and following. By matching, this involves checking the near point and the far point, and visually averaging the positions such that the eyes do not have to instantly reconverge at the transitions. As with editing in general, this comes with practice and experience.

    Sometimes, especially if parallaxes change within a particular shot, it is also necessary to "ramp" the global shift at the beginning and/or end of the shot(s) to make this smooth. The general rule here is to ramp 50 percent on the outgoing shot and 50 percent on an incoming shot, similar to a dissolve, but in this case it applies to all transitions whether dissolves, fades, wipes, or even crash cuts.

    Sometimes the lateral shifts necessary to effect these smooth stereoscopic transitions result in left and/or right frame edge violations. When this happens, the editing correction is usually a dynamic floating window.

    Many other considerations may occur with specific shots and scenes that affect the stereoscopic impression. But, these are the main ones for the editor beginning in this fascinating challanging but intriguing skill acquisition.
    Continuing - Sorry, I was interrupted and did not get to complete this. The question was asked about viewing stereoscopically. There are many options for this now, depending primarily on the display being used. If it is a stereoscopic display that will accept the type of files that you are using, this is great. But, there are a couple of ways that the images may be viewed stereoscopically even with conventional 2D monitors.

    One of the simplest of these is the anaglyph, usually the red/cyan type. However, this type does affect the color.

    Some editors like to use a technique that many animators and CG artists use, and that is crossview freeviewing. For this purpose, the two images are displayed side-by-side and transposed, such that the left eye-view is on the right and the right eye-view is on the left. You slightly cross your eyes to fuse the images. It takes practice at first, but once accomplished it is usually much easier the second time, and so on. Sometimes this may seem uncomfortable, but usually the reason is viewing too close. Especially when learning, it is good to view from a considerable distance. As the eye muscles strengthen, you can comfortably view this way much closer.

    It is not as unnatural as the term "cross viewing" may imply. Many, perhaps most people do this frequently without realizing it. When reading a book or looking at a computer screen, the eyes normally converge. In fact, one way of learning this is to hold up a book (or any object, even your thumb) about half way between you and the display screen. Look at the book, and slowly lower the book while keeping your gaze forward toward the screen.

    As you lower the book or other object, you will see two displaced images of the screen coming into view. When you are holding the book at the right distance, each half of the screen will appear overlayed, but out of focus. The trick is to let the screen come into focus without "popping apart". This is where the practice comes in. It seems very difficult the first time, but each time it gets easier. What you want to see is not two images, as you normally would, but rather three because of the overlap. When you do, the center one will be seen stereoscopically.

  6. #6
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    Sony Vegas 11 claims to edit 3D. There is a free demo on their site. See if it works for you.

 

 

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